Kc and Kp

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maldonadojs
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Kc and Kp

Postby maldonadojs » Sat Jan 12, 2019 7:46 pm

I enrolled a few days late and I am trying to catch up on the lecture notes. I am confused as to what the difference between Kc and Kp is. What is the difference and how am I supposed to acknowledge the differences.

Alexandra Albers 1D
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Kc and Kp

Postby Alexandra Albers 1D » Sat Jan 12, 2019 8:19 pm

Kc is the equilibrium constant when using molar concentrations in the calculation and Kp is the equilibrium constant when using partial pressures. If your calculations use gases then either Kp or Kc, but if aqueous compounds are involved, only Kc would be used as only gases can have partial pressures.

Nicholas Le 4H
Posts: 74
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Kc and Kp

Postby Nicholas Le 4H » Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:17 pm

Both Kc and Kp are both equilibrium constants except that Kc is for molar concentrations while Kp is for partial pressures.

AngelaZ 1J
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Kc and Kp

Postby AngelaZ 1J » Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:19 pm

Kc is the equilibrium constant calculated using molar concentrations of the products and reactants. Kp is the equilibrium constant using partial pressures of the products and reactants. You can write either the Kc or Kp for a problem involving gases only.

Amar Singh
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:20 am

Re: Kc and Kp

Postby Amar Singh » Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:23 pm

Kc is the equilibrium constant for molar concentrations. This is typically used with aqueous solutions, however there are certain times that you would use them with gases (not things you have to worry about right now). Kp is what you should be using to denote the equilibrium constant for gases with partial pressures.


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