K vs Q

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Valeria Viera 1B
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

K vs Q

Postby Valeria Viera 1B » Sun Jan 13, 2019 7:45 pm

What are some of the main differences between K and Q? how are they similar?

Diviya Khullar 1G
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: K vs Q

Postby Diviya Khullar 1G » Sun Jan 13, 2019 7:48 pm

K is the equilibrium constant and is used when the reaction is in equilibrium. Q is the reaction quotient and is what we need to find when the reaction is not in equilibrium or if we are not sure if the reaction is in equilibrium.

Sarah Bui 2L
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: K vs Q

Postby Sarah Bui 2L » Sun Jan 13, 2019 7:52 pm

For the reaction quotient, Q you are able to measure to the concentration of the reaction at any given time (could be not at equilibrium). In ways they are similar, they are pretty much calculated in the same way with products divided by reactants (including the coefficients as well). Q could also be used to compare to k, for example
if Q<k, then the forward rxn is favored
if Q>k then the reverse rxn is favored
if Q=k then it's at equilibrium

hope this helps!

Yiting_Gong_4L
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: K vs Q

Postby Yiting_Gong_4L » Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:06 am

K is the constant at equilibrium, Q is the reaction quotient which means the constant when it is not yet at equilibrium.
However, Q and K can be compared to find which reaction is favored (forward or reverse).

Angel Chen 2k
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:20 am

Re: K vs Q

Postby Angel Chen 2k » Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:09 am

To summarize the posts above, K is for the reaction which reaches it equilibrium, while Q is for the reaction which does not reach its equilibrium. Comparing the values of K and Q can indicate us the position of equilibrium and the direction that the reaction proceeds.


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