Ionization Constant

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Reva Kakaria 1J
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Ionization Constant

Postby Reva Kakaria 1J » Tue Jan 15, 2019 3:03 pm

In lecture, Dr. Lavelle stated that the ionization constant of water is Kw = [H3O+][OH-] = 10^-14. What exactly does ionization constant mean? Is it the same thing as equilibrium constant?

Sarah Zhao 4C
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Ionization Constant

Postby Sarah Zhao 4C » Tue Jan 15, 2019 3:07 pm

In terms of water, the ionization constant is the same as the equilibrium constant. In the breaking down of water, it creates ions H+ and OH-. So we are able to interchangeable use the words ionization constant.

Olivia L 4E
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Re: Ionization Constant

Postby Olivia L 4E » Tue Jan 15, 2019 3:09 pm

Do you remember the Lewis structure diagrams Lavelle drew in class? They are depicting the formation of H3O+ and OH- ions (ionizations). The ionization constant of water refers to level at which H3O+ and OH- are equal. 10^-14 is the equilibrium constant of the chemical reaction so 10^-14 = [H3O+][OH-]. We call this "ionization constant" because we are solely referring to ions and this is the basis of which all acid and base concentrations/pH follow.


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