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Concentration

Posted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:10 pm
by jlinwashington1B
What's the difference between Q & K

Re: Concentration

Posted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:12 pm
by Andre_Galenchik_2L
K is the actual equilibrium constant of a reaction at a certain temperature. Q is called the reaction quotient and is just used as a reference point when the reaction you have at hand is not yet at equilibrium. They both have the same formula, it is just that K uses the formula when the reaction is at equilibrium while Q does it while the reaction is not at equilibrium.

Re: Concentration

Posted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:19 pm
by Joanna Pham - 2D
Adding on to what Andre said, if Q < K, then it means there's a greater concentration of reactants, which means the reaction will favor and produce more products (reaction goes to the right) since it'll want to balance out the equation. However, if Q > K, then it means there's a greater amount of products, which means the reaction will favor and produce more reactants to balance the equation out .

Re: Concentration

Posted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 11:17 pm
by Vicky Lu 1L
K stands for Equilibrium Constant which describes the reaction at equilibrium. Q is the reaction quotient which describes the reaction at any point in time. We compare K and Q as it will tell us whether the reaction is favoring the reactant, products, or neither. If Q>K, then he reaction favors the reactant, Q<K then the reaction favor the product and if Q=K then the reaction is at equilibrium.

Re: Concentration

Posted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 11:34 pm
by Eric Quach 1C
K is the equilibrium constant and represents the ratio of products to reactants at equilibrium. While Q is the reaction quotient and is the ratio of products to reactants at a certain point in time (can be before or at equilibrium). Remember if Q does not equal K that means the reaction is not at equilibrium and will either go through the forward reaction or backward reaction in order to reach equilibrium.