Page 1 of 1

Initial Concentration and Equilibrium Concentration

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 10:26 pm
by Nathan Mariano 2G
"If one starts with higher concentrations of reactants, the equilibrium concentrations of the products will be larger." Why is this statement true? Can there be a case where the equilibrium concentration of the product is smaller than the initial concentration of the reactants?

Re: Initial Concentration and Equilibrium Concentration

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 10:40 pm
by Sara Flynn 2C
I think it just means that if you have more reactant initially then compared to how much product would be formed if you had less reactant there would be more. Like if you had 2 moles of reactant and it made 3 moles of product, if you had 4 moles of reactant then it would make 6 moles of product.

Re: Initial Concentration and Equilibrium Concentration

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 1:03 am
by Gary Qiao 1D
I'm guessing that the question is kind of talking about how relative to the equilibrium concentration, when there is more initial concentration, then the reaction tends to favor the products in order to reach the equilibrium concentrations. So there probably is a case where the product is smaller than the initial concentration of reactants.

Re: Initial Concentration and Equilibrium Concentration

Posted: Tue Mar 12, 2019 4:14 am
by KimGiang2F
Although adding a reactant increases the concentration of products at equilibrium, the increase in product concentration won't necessarily mean that the equilibrium product concentration becomes higher than that for the reactants. If K is bigger than one, the equilibrium concentration of the products will be greater than that for the reactants. If K is less than one, the equilibrium concentration of the reactants is bigger.