5G.1  [ENDORSED]

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ayushibanerjee06
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5G.1

Postby ayushibanerjee06 » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:15 pm

Can someone explain why if you start with a higher pressure of reactant, the equilibrium constant will be larger?

SnehinRajkumar1L
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: 5G.1

Postby SnehinRajkumar1L » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:25 pm

I don't think higher pressure means that the equilibrium constant is larger. The constant is always set for a specific reaction regardless of pressure.

Nikki Razal 1L
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Re: 5G.1  [ENDORSED]

Postby Nikki Razal 1L » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:32 pm

for this question, the statement, "If one starts with a higher pressure of reactant, the equilibrium
constant will be larger" is false because your initial concentration increases, causing the equilibrium constant to be smaller. For example,if you had the equation N2+3H2 <-->2NH3 and an initial concentration of 0.1 for each component K=[nh3]^2/[n2][h2]^3=100, but if pressure increased (specifically if it doubles), your initial concentration would be 0.2 for each component, and K=25

Andres Merlos 2L
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:17 am

Re: 5G.1

Postby Andres Merlos 2L » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:50 pm

So for this exercise, you have to determine which statements are true or false. If I am correct, you are referring to part c of 5G.1. The statement that if you start with a higher pressure of reactant, the equilibrium will be larger, is false.

Kristina Rizo 2K
Posts: 105
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: 5G.1

Postby Kristina Rizo 2K » Sat Jan 11, 2020 5:52 pm

The pressure doesn't affect the equilibrium constant. However, I think the professor stated that it does alter the overall reaction.


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