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Finding K: liquids and aqueous

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:38 pm
by Abigail Menchaca_1H
Why do we keep aqueous solutions in the concentration equations and not liquids?

Re: Finding K: liquids and aqueous

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:41 pm
by Hussain Chharawalla 1G
Aqueous solutions have a defined concentration. For example 10 moles of salt in one liter of aqueous solution is 10M concentration. However, a liquid by itself cannot be measured in concentration. If you had just water, you would not be able to write it in terms of a concentration.

Re: Finding K: liquids and aqueous

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:43 pm
by Emil Velasco 1H
While liquids do not have a defined concentration (molarity), aqueous solutions do.

Re: Finding K: liquids and aqueous

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:50 pm
by 005324438
Liquids are pure substances and therefor cannot have a concentration. To have a concentration there needs to be a solute in a solvent, 2 substances, liquids are only 1 substance.

Re: Finding K: liquids and aqueous

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:16 pm
by Althea Zhao 1B
Liquids don't change, so they cancel out.

Re: Finding K: liquids and aqueous

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:35 pm
by chari_maya 3B
Is this the same case for solids?

Re: Finding K: liquids and aqueous

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 6:00 pm
by 405268063
Yes, this is the same case for solids. Their concentrations do not change.

Re: Finding K: liquids and aqueous

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 7:51 pm
by AGaeta_2C
To clarify,
solids are not included in the K expression because they don't necessarily have a "concentration," and liquids are not included because they consist of a pure substance?

Is this thinking correct?