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What is K

Posted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:39 pm
by Ellis Song 4I
What exactly is just K compared to Kc and Kp

Re: What is K

Posted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:43 pm
by Justin Seok 2A
K is pretty much a more ambiguous term than either Kc or Kp. Often times when K is used, it should be pretty apparent whether Kc or Kp should be used, like with Kp when you are given partial pressures or Kc when there are no gas-phase reactants or products.

Re: What is K

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:45 am
by Eunice Nguyen 4I
K is just equilibrium constant (also referred to as Keq). Kc refers to when you're using aqueous reactants/products, whereas you'd use Kp for gaseous reactions.

Re: What is K

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:15 am
by Kate Swertfager
I think of K as the blanket term for the equilibrium constant. Then more specifically we have Kc, Kp and Kw which are all slightly different but refer to the equilibrium constant as well.

Re: What is K

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:09 am
by Jaci Glassick 2G
K is the equilibrium constants. Kc, Kp, Kw are just different "types"/"ways" of finding K. With Kc, you use concentrations of the products and reactants (Kc=P/R). With Kp, you use partial pressures (Kp=Pp/Pr).

Re: What is K

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:18 am
by Jasmine Vallarta 2L
K can represent both Kc and Kp. Kc is specific to a species' concentration and Kp is for a gas' partial pressure.

Re: What is K

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:41 am
by preyasikumar_2L
I'm pretty sure Kc, Kp, Kw, Keq, Ka, Kb, etc are all different ways to clarify K, the equilibrium constant, by what is being used to calculate that value.
Kc is the equilibrium constant that is calculated using the concentrations of aqueous substances or gases of a system at equilibrium.
Kp is the equilibrium constant that is calculated using the partial pressures of gases of a system at equilibrium.
Kw is the equilibrium constant of pure water (in the reaction where H2O(l) <--> H3O+(aq) + OH-(aq))
Keq is another way to say K, the equilibrium constant.
(I think, please correct me if I'm wrong) Ka and Kb are the equilibrium constants of systems that involve the creation/dissociation(?) of acids and bases respectively.