ICE table

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205192823
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

ICE table

Postby 205192823 » Mon Mar 09, 2020 11:58 pm

When solving for concentrations with the ice table, in what situation can you assume x is too small and therefore can be excluded from the equation? EX: 0.2-x, in this situation would I just disregard x and just keep 0.2?

Jordan Young 2J
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Re: ICE table

Postby Jordan Young 2J » Tue Mar 10, 2020 12:07 am

You can assume x is small when the equilibrium constant (K) is less than 10^-3 as a general rule of thumb. But to test it, after you calculate the equilibrium concentration, you can do the equilibrium concentration of the conjugate base divided by the initial concentration of the weak acid times 100 (percent dissociation/protonation) and if it is less than 5%, then your assumption is valid.

anjali41
Posts: 109
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: ICE table

Postby anjali41 » Tue Mar 10, 2020 12:27 am

When the K value is less than 10-3, it is generally safe to estimate without the x. However, make sure to only exclude variables that are being added or subtracted. To make sure estimation was appropriate, make sure the percent dissociation is under 5%.

Naneeta Desar 1K
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Re: ICE table

Postby Naneeta Desar 1K » Tue Mar 10, 2020 1:01 am

When the equilibrium constant is less than 10^-3 you can assume x is negligible.

WGaines_2E
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Joined: Mon Nov 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: ICE table

Postby WGaines_2E » Tue Mar 10, 2020 9:20 pm

if equilibrium constant K is less than 10^-3 then you can ignore x for the initial concentrations. Also if the calculated constant is less than 5% of the initial concentration you can neglect x in your calculation as well.

Nicholas_Gladkov_2J
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Re: ICE table

Postby Nicholas_Gladkov_2J » Tue Mar 10, 2020 9:26 pm

205192823 wrote:When solving for concentrations with the ice table, in what situation can you assume x is too small and therefore can be excluded from the equation? EX: 0.2-x, in this situation would I just disregard x and just keep 0.2?


When K is less than 10^-3, then you can disregard the change in concentration of the reactants (usually -x), as such a little number of moles of reactant were converted to product.


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