Pure Substances Concentration

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Funmi Baruwa
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Pure Substances Concentration

Postby Funmi Baruwa » Tue Jan 05, 2021 6:15 pm

In Monday’s lecture Dr. Lavelle said that sold and kiwis don’t have concentration. So then in the example he gave, why did he count the products that were in the aqueous phase?

Thank you in advance :) -

Xinying Wang_3C
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

Re: Pure Substances Concentration

Postby Xinying Wang_3C » Tue Jan 05, 2021 6:19 pm

I think the pure substance he mentioned is solid (like metals) and liquid (like water, for example). Aqueous is often counting into the concentration since it is not "pure" I guess, if this helps.

Daniel Huynh 2J
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2020 12:16 am

Re: Pure Substances Concentration

Postby Daniel Huynh 2J » Tue Jan 05, 2021 6:30 pm

Aqueous substances are not considered pure substances, rather they are solutes that participate in the reaction and must be included in the equilibrium calculations.

Anirudh Mahadev 1G
Posts: 141
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

Re: Pure Substances Concentration

Postby Anirudh Mahadev 1G » Tue Jan 05, 2021 6:36 pm

Aqueous substances are simply dissolved in water, they do not make up liquid as a pure substance. For example, hydrochloric acid is not often 100% HCl, it is normally a small percentage of the total volume, such as 5% HCl.

derickngo3d
Posts: 80
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:51 pm

Re: Pure Substances Concentration

Postby derickngo3d » Tue Jan 05, 2021 7:27 pm

The aqueous substances have significant and measurable changes in concentration, whereas the solvent water is present in such a high amount that the change is negligible.


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