Gibbs free energy in Relation to K

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Bailey Giovanoli 1L
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Gibbs free energy in Relation to K

Postby Bailey Giovanoli 1L » Wed Jan 06, 2021 7:24 pm

I've been noticing that in some of the sections, such as 5I.2, there are yellow boxes titled "How it is explained." I noticed these boxes contain one section on thermodynamics and tend to be heavily based around Gibbs Free Energy. In Lavelle's discussion earlier tonight, he said we would touch on thermodynamics and go into Gibbs Free Energy later on. Therefore, these explanations would not necessarily be of use to us, correct? I ask this because they don't necessarily fall into what he's teaching and are not a part of the Chemical Equilibrium outline.

Nicole Huang 3F
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Re: Gibbs free energy in Relation to K

Postby Nicole Huang 3F » Wed Jan 06, 2021 8:09 pm

I think the explanation will probably be relevant later and for more cumulative exercises like for our final and stuff like that, but for now he hasn't exactly covered it so I wouldn't worry about it too much. I think knowing what Gibbs free energy is and maybe the general idea of the concept might be helpful for later though.

Evie Li_1H
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Re: Gibbs free energy in Relation to K

Postby Evie Li_1H » Wed Jan 06, 2021 9:11 pm

I think for now we won't be expected to know it, but in Outline 4 on Lavelle's Website (the one on thermodynamics) one of the bulletpoints actually says "Show how the Gibbs free energy change accompanying a process is related to the direction of spontaneous reaction." So yes, eventually, we will have to learn it but not for now.

Darren1j
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Re: Gibbs free energy in Relation to K

Postby Darren1j » Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:56 am

Two of the sapling questions revolve around K and change in enthalpy. Thus in reactions with a + change in enthalpy, they are endothermic, and increasing the temperature increases K. In a reaction with a negative change in enthalpy, it is exothermic, and an increase in temperature decreases K.


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