the different Ks

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Funmi Baruwa
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

the different Ks

Postby Funmi Baruwa » Fri Jan 15, 2021 11:55 am

I am confused about the different Ks: Ka, Kb, Kw, Kc, and Kp. What exactly are the differences between them?

vanessanguyen3I
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Re: the different Ks

Postby vanessanguyen3I » Fri Jan 15, 2021 11:58 am

Ka, Kb, Kw, Kc, and Kp

Ka: This is when you find the K value for a reaction with a compound that is acting as an acid.
Kb: This is when you find the K value for a reaction with a : compound that is acting as a base.
Kw: This is a constant!! At 25 degrees Celscius, it is 10ˆ-14 but it changes as temperature changes. This is the K value for water autoprotolysis.
Kc: Use this when you find the K value for a reaction (not including an acid or a base) and the units you're using is molarity
Kp: Use this when you find the K value for a reaction (not including an acid or a base) consisting of just gases and you have their partial pressures.

Note: you calculate all of these the same way. The notation is just different.

Ivy Tan 1E
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Re: the different Ks

Postby Ivy Tan 1E » Fri Jan 15, 2021 12:01 pm

Hi!
K represents the equilibrium constant of a given reaction. There are different types of Ks because they are used for different reactions involving different substances.
Ka: equilibrium constant for reactions involving acids.
Kb: equilibrium constant for reactions involving bases.
Kw: equilibrium constant for water.
Kc: equilibrium constant for any reaction where reactants and products are at equilibrium (using concentration: mols/L)
Kp: equilibrium constant for reactions involving gases where reactants and products are at equilibrium (using partial pressure)
I hope this summary helped!!

Felicia Wei 1B
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2020 12:28 am

Re: the different Ks

Postby Felicia Wei 1B » Fri Jan 15, 2021 12:14 pm

Adding on to that
Kw can be used to calculate Ka and Kb when given two using the equation Kw=Ka*Kb


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