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Q

Posted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 10:10 pm
by Hanniel U 2B
Can someone please help me with 5G.11 7th edition?

Re: Q

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:19 pm
by Venya Vaddi 1L
Q is written the same way as K is. Q=[products]/[reactants] and both solids and liquids are excluded from the expression.

Re: Q

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:36 pm
by Katie Frei 1L
To find Q, or the reaction quotient, you would need to use the same equation used to find K, or the equilibrium constant. Also only include gases and aqueous phases in your equation to find Q.

Re: Q

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:45 pm
by Anusha 1H
Use the same approach you use to find K (products/reactants).

a) for example would be -- Q = 1/(P BCl3)^2

Re: Q

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:55 pm
by Hai-Lin Yeh 1J
How did you get 1 in the numerator? I know that the molar concentration of a pure substance (solid or liquid) does not change in a reaction so they are not included, but where did you get the 1 from?

Re: Q

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:58 pm
by Karyn Nguyen 1K
Can someone explain what exactly Q is? I know that it is the reactant quotient but I don't get why Q and K wouldn't always equal each other if they have the same formula [P]/[R]?

Re: Q

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:03 pm
by EllerySchlingmann1E
Q and K are not always the same because Q represents [P]/[R] at any time in the reaction while K represents that ratio only when the reaction is at equilibrium. If Q does not equal K, we know that the equation is not at equilibrium.