Reaction Quotient

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chrisavalos-2L
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Reaction Quotient

Postby chrisavalos-2L » Tue Jan 15, 2019 12:58 am

I was a little confused on exactly what the reaction quotient is. So it is calculated the same way that K is, but why is it considered a separate entity?

Emma Scholes 1L
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby Emma Scholes 1L » Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:40 am

K is used to describe a reaction that is at equilibrium. The reaction quotient is used to describe a reaction that is not at equilibrium. If Q is equal to K, the reaction is at equilibrium.

Charles Hood Disc 1C
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby Charles Hood Disc 1C » Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:46 am

The reaction quotient is calculated during the reaction, rather than at the end. Depending on its value it can give you information about how the reaction will proceed (e.g. if Q>K then there are too many products and it will favour the left).

Lisa Werner 2F
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby Lisa Werner 2F » Tue Jan 15, 2019 2:57 pm

K specifically describes the reaction at equilibrium, whereas Q can describe the reaction at any time.

Sophie Roberts 1E
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby Sophie Roberts 1E » Tue Jan 15, 2019 6:35 pm

The reaction quotient can be calculated the same way as K. The concentration values used for the calculation of Q are the values before the reaction reaches equilibrium, and the values used to calculate K are the values when the reaction is at equilibrium.

Ibrahim Malik 1H
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Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby Ibrahim Malik 1H » Tue Jan 15, 2019 8:06 pm

Q is a reaction quotient taken at any point of time for the reaction, whereas K is the reaction quotient taken specifically at equilibrium.

Kelsey Warren 1I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby Kelsey Warren 1I » Tue Jan 15, 2019 8:12 pm

Just to add on a little, the reaction quotient can be used to determine if the reaction will proceed forward or backward to reach equilibrium. For example, if the reaction quotient is smaller than the equilibrium constant, then the reaction will proceed forward to make more products to increase the value of Q until it equals the value of K.

kimberlyrose1G
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Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby kimberlyrose1G » Thu Jan 17, 2019 9:08 pm

K describes a reaction when it is at equilibrium, while the reactant quotient (value Q), can describe a reaction that is not at equilibrium, helping deduce whether the reaction is moving forward or in reverse depending on if it is sitting/shifting to the right or to the left, respectively.

Diana Bibireata 1B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby Diana Bibireata 1B » Thu Jan 17, 2019 10:29 pm

Both K and Q are calculated the same way. K just describes the reaction at equilibrium and tells us whether there are more products or reactants at equilibrium. Q can be calculated at any part of the reaction and is used to determine the direction which a reaction will proceed.

Eva Zhao 4I
Posts: 101
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby Eva Zhao 4I » Tue Jan 21, 2020 10:23 am

Q expresses the relative ratio of products to reactants at a given instant not necessarily at equilibrium, which is why you compare Q and K to determine the direction of the reaction. The reaction shifts right if Q<K, shifts left if Q>K, and is at equilibrium when Q=K.

Kaylee Clarke 1G
Posts: 103
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Reaction Quotient

Postby Kaylee Clarke 1G » Tue Jan 21, 2020 11:31 am

K is the reaction at equilibrium and Q occurs at any point in the reaction. When q<K, it is a forward reaction and the opposite is a reverse reaction.


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