Calculating pH of a weak acid and its salt

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AlyssaBei_1F
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Calculating pH of a weak acid and its salt

Postby AlyssaBei_1F » Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:26 am

For calculating the pH of a weak acid and its salt, is an extra number given, but the steps to complete the problem are the same?

almaochoa2D
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Calculating pH of a weak acid and its salt

Postby almaochoa2D » Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:35 am

yes, there is just an initial concentration for the salt as well as the weak acid. But the steps are the same.

Neil Hsu 2A
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Calculating pH of a weak acid and its salt

Postby Neil Hsu 2A » Wed Jan 23, 2019 1:41 am

Yes, the steps are exactly the same as calculating without a salt (though the calculations might be a bit more difficult). In these types of problems, the thing to note is that the initial concentration for the salt (or product of the salt) will not be zero. Therefore, the equilibrium concentration for it would be initial + x.

Michelle Nwufo 2G
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Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:00 am

Re: Calculating pH of a weak acid and its salt

Postby Michelle Nwufo 2G » Wed Jan 23, 2019 11:34 am

Neil Hsu 2A wrote:Yes, the steps are exactly the same as calculating without a salt (though the calculations might be a bit more difficult). In these types of problems, the thing to note is that the initial concentration for the salt (or product of the salt) will not be zero. Therefore, the equilibrium concentration for it would be initial + x.


Doesn’t the change in X depended on whether the concentration of the reactant or product is greater?

Alyssa Wilson 2A
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Calculating pH of a weak acid and its salt

Postby Alyssa Wilson 2A » Sun Jan 27, 2019 5:55 pm

Michelle Nwufo 2G wrote:
Neil Hsu 2A wrote:Yes, the steps are exactly the same as calculating without a salt (though the calculations might be a bit more difficult). In these types of problems, the thing to note is that the initial concentration for the salt (or product of the salt) will not be zero. Therefore, the equilibrium concentration for it would be initial + x.


Doesn’t the change in X depended on whether the concentration of the reactant or product is greater?


I believe so, but if you are talking about the concentration of x on the reactant side they will always have -value of x because you are losing the reactant to create equilibrium with the products.


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