change in temp

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annikaying
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

change in temp

Postby annikaying » Thu Jan 16, 2020 5:43 pm

Why does a reaction favor products when heated if is endothermic?

Connor Chappell 2B
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: change in temp

Postby Connor Chappell 2B » Thu Jan 16, 2020 5:45 pm

A reaction that is endothermic requires heat to occur. Therefore, if we were to heat this reaction, it would favor the production of the reactions products, as sufficient heat is being applied to the system in order to elicit a reaction.

chrisleung-2J
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Re: change in temp

Postby chrisleung-2J » Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:25 pm

We can treat the heat term when written in the equation in a very similar manner as a standard product or reactant. If the reaction is endothermic, the heat term would be written on the reactants side of the forward reaction, and increasing the temperature has a similar effect as increasing the concentration of a reactant in the equation.

Hailey Kim 4G
Posts: 110
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: change in temp

Postby Hailey Kim 4G » Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:26 pm

If a reaction is endothermic, that means it absorbs heat and heat is used as a reactant. In endothermic reactions, an increase in temperature (heat) leads to an increase in reactants. According to Le Chatelier's Principle, the reaction would then shift to the products to reach equilibrium.

DanielTalebzadehShoushtari2A
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: change in temp

Postby DanielTalebzadehShoushtari2A » Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:41 pm

chrisleung-2J wrote:We can treat the heat term when written in the equation in a very similar manner as a standard product or reactant. If the reaction is endothermic, the heat term would be written on the reactants side of the forward reaction, and increasing the temperature has a similar effect as increasing the concentration of a reactant in the equation.


This is a good explanation, but I would just like to note that a change in temperature changes the equilibrium constant itself, whereas a change in concentration of a reactant causes a shift back to the original equilibrium ratio.


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