ICE Tables

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Andrea_Torres
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ICE Tables

Postby Andrea_Torres » Sun Jan 19, 2020 5:52 pm

Why is it that H2O gets cancelled out when doing ice tables?

Matthew Chan 1B
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Re: ICE Tables

Postby Matthew Chan 1B » Sun Jan 19, 2020 5:54 pm

It's usually because H2O is in excess, which means that we cancel it out, since there's no real change to it. I think Lavelle gave the analogy: If someone has one million dollars, and they give ten dollars to someone else, we don't say that they have $999,990. We just say that they have about a million dollars, since they have money "in excess". I hope that helps.

Viviana Velasquez
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: ICE Tables

Postby Viviana Velasquez » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:37 pm

It's usually because it is in liquid form, but you only include H2O when it is aqueous or gas form.

kausalya_1k
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Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:23 am

Re: ICE Tables

Postby kausalya_1k » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:40 pm

It's because H2O is usually provided in excess during experimental conditions. Also, since it's a liquid, it will have a concentration of 1 always.

Christine Honda 2I
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Re: ICE Tables

Postby Christine Honda 2I » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:48 pm

H2O is often not included because it is a liquid, or solvent in the solution. Therefore, it is not included in the K expression or in the ICE table.

Ashley Nguyen 2L
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Re: ICE Tables

Postby Ashley Nguyen 2L » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:29 pm

H2O is usually not included in its liquid form because it has a concentration of 1 at all times.

Louise Lin 2B
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Re: ICE Tables

Postby Louise Lin 2B » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:41 pm

H2O isn't usually included because it is provided in excess in experiments, and is usually in liquid form. Liquid and solids are not supposed to be included in ICE tables.

Eesha Sohail 1D
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: ICE Tables

Postby Eesha Sohail 1D » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:50 pm

I understand the logic of the excess analogy, but how does the concept of chemical "activities" factor into this concept?

IScarvie 1E
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: ICE Tables

Postby IScarvie 1E » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:56 pm

H2O is in excess, so the change in concentration is negligible

Nuoya Jiang
Posts: 99
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: ICE Tables

Postby Nuoya Jiang » Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:23 pm

Is it the same reason that we do not include it when we are calculating the equilibrium constant?

Jesse Anderson-Ramirez 3I
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Joined: Thu Sep 26, 2019 12:18 am

Re: ICE Tables

Postby Jesse Anderson-Ramirez 3I » Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:24 pm

H20 is not included when it is in liquid form.

Owen-Koetters-4I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: ICE Tables

Postby Owen-Koetters-4I » Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:26 pm

Oftentimes H2O is in excess. Also if it H2O were to be in liquid or solid form we wouldn't include it in the ICE table, as its activity would simply be 1.

SimranSangha4I
Posts: 99
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: ICE Tables

Postby SimranSangha4I » Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:30 pm

H2O would have the concentration of 1 as well as it is normally in excess.

Nare Nazaryan 1F
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: ICE Tables

Postby Nare Nazaryan 1F » Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:41 pm

Because it's a liquid and because it's in excess (as a solvent), it is not included.


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