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Kc vs K

Posted: Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:41 pm
by Rita Chen 1B
Whats the difference between Kc and K?

Re: Kc vs K

Posted: Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:45 pm
by Robin Cadd 1D
K refers to the equilibrium constant. Kc is the equilibrium constant calculated by using concentrations. Basically, Kc is a subset of K.

Re: Kc vs K

Posted: Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:49 pm
by Rita Chen 1B
So when do we use K and when do we use Kc? When will we need to convert and how do we convert it?

Re: Kc vs K

Posted: Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:51 pm
by Eunice Nguyen 4I
Rita Chen 1B wrote:So when do we use K and when do we use Kc? When will we need to convert and how do we convert it?

You use Kc when dealing with molar concentrations when you're figuring out the equilibrium constant. You don't really convert between K and Kc, because as the previous answer stated, Kc is basically a subset of K.

Re: Kc vs K

Posted: Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:52 pm
by Rita Chen 1B
But what if the Kc and K are different? Will we usually be given K or Kc depending on which one we use?

Re: Kc vs K

Posted: Tue Jan 21, 2020 1:35 am
by stephaniekim2K
Kc is the equilibrium constant that's calculated by the concentrations but it is calculated the same way as just "K."

Re: Kc vs K

Posted: Tue Jan 21, 2020 10:25 am
by Sam McNeill 1E
I was confused on this as well, the textbook made it seem like there were different values for K and Kc?

Re: Kc vs K

Posted: Tue Jan 21, 2020 11:27 am
by Kaylee Clarke 1G
K is indicative of equilibrium and can be used with many subscripts. So, K can be applied to many equilibrium forms but Kc is simply the equilibrium constant.