11.1

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Leah Savage 2F
Posts: 74
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

11.1

Postby Leah Savage 2F » Tue Nov 28, 2017 2:35 pm

Can someone explain why this is true? "If one starts with higher concentrations of reactants, the equilibrium concentrations of the products will be larger." I don't really understand what they mean by "the equilibrium concentrations of the products will be larger." Larger than the equilibrium concentrations of the reactants? I feel like you can't figure out whether the equilibrium concentrations of the products will be larger than the equilibrium concentrations of the reactants without knowing the equilibrium constant.

RahilVaknalliDis3A
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Re: 11.1

Postby RahilVaknalliDis3A » Tue Nov 28, 2017 2:39 pm

I think this implies that increasing the concentration of the reactants would push the formation of more product, hence increasing the concentration of the product. But this still makes sure that the ratio of the concentration of products/ concentration of reactants remains the same, therefore the value of K does not change.

Mia Navarro 1D
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: 11.1

Postby Mia Navarro 1D » Tue Nov 28, 2017 3:34 pm

To elaborate, increasing the amount of reactant increases the number of moles. This increase in moles then increases the moles per liter of the reactant, also known as the concentration. Because K will only change if the temperature changes, the ratio must be adjusted proportionately, and the product will therefore increase in concentration.

Phillip Winters 2F
Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am

Re: 11.1

Postby Phillip Winters 2F » Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:52 pm

In order to re-establish equilibrium, the reaction will convert some of these new reactants into products, which is why the addition of reactants will result in the formation of more products.

Julie Steklof 1A
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: 11.1

Postby Julie Steklof 1A » Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:03 pm

Because the only thing changed in the problem is concentration and k is constant regardless of initial concentrations, more product must be formed in order to make the ratio of concentration of products to concentration of reactants (k) the same.


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