7th Edition 5J.1

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Maggie Doan 1I
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

7th Edition 5J.1

Postby Maggie Doan 1I » Wed Jan 16, 2019 8:34 pm

CO + H2O ⇌ CO2 +H2
c) If the concentration of CO is increased, what happens to the concentration of H2?
Why would H2 increase?

Alexa Tabakian 1A
Posts: 38
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:20 am

Re: 7th Edition 5J.1

Postby Alexa Tabakian 1A » Wed Jan 16, 2019 8:40 pm

The concentration of H2 would increase because there is now more CO that is available to react. Also, the concentration of H2 would increase in order to keep the equilibrium constant the same.

Manya Bali 4E
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: 7th Edition 5J.1

Postby Manya Bali 4E » Wed Jan 16, 2019 8:41 pm

You could go about this two ways. One is to create a Q value, [CO2][H2]/[CO][H2O]. If the CO concentration is increased that means that the denominator for Q will be bigger than whatever this ratio is for K. Thus, overall Q will be less than K. To balance out this change and go back toward equilibrium, the value of Q must increase, and the reaction will do this by increasing the concentrations of the products (numerator).

Alternatively, using Le Chatelier's Principle, chemical reactions will adjust to minimize changes. So, if more reactant (CO) is added, then the reaction will favor the forward direction and form more product (H2) until the original product to reactant ratio is maintained.

tierra parker 1J
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: 7th Edition 5J.1

Postby tierra parker 1J » Thu Jan 17, 2019 7:15 pm

the concentration H2 would increase because you want to keep the equilibrium constant the same so if you increase CO then the same would happen to H2


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