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Le Chatelier's Principle- example from class

Posted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:29 pm
by Hailey Boehm 2H
In class we looked at the chemical equation: N2(g) + 3H2(G) =(double arrows) 2 NH3 (g).
What happens if we: increase N2? increase NH3? decrease H2?

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle- example from class

Posted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:34 pm
by Chloe Qiao 4C
Le Chatelier's principle is that after a change occurs, the reaction shifts to minimize the change.

In the above equation, increasing [N2] would cause the reaction to shift right(forming more products), increasing [NH3] and decreasing [H2] will both cause the reaction to shift left (more reactants will form).

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle- example from class

Posted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:35 pm
by Emma Scholes 1L
If we increase N2 the reaction will proceed to the right so more product is formed.
If we increase NH3 the reaction will proceed to the left so more reactants are formed.
If we decrease H2 the reaction will proceed to the left so more reactants are formed.

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle- example from class

Posted: Thu Jan 17, 2019 3:43 pm
by Madeline Motamedi 4I
I like to think of it like this: the specific chemical reaction has its own Kc it wants to maintain. So think of the whole reaction as a fraction that needs to maintain its proportions. If the top of the fraction represents concentration of products and the bottom represents concentration of reactants we can solve the problem. So if N2 (a reactant) is increased, our fraction has more weight on the reactant's side meaning the equation will produce more products to balance it out and maintain the ratio. Now using the same logic, if we increase NH3 (a product) our fraction has more weight on the product's side meaning the equation will produce more reactants to balance it out. And lastly, if we decrease H2 (a reactant), we can simply produce more of the other reactant (N2) to rebalance to equilibrium.