Inert Gas

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Brandon Mo 4K
Posts: 70
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Inert Gas

Postby Brandon Mo 4K » Fri Jan 18, 2019 2:35 am

Why does adding inert gas to a container have no effect in reactant, product concentration, and the reaction?

Does this apply to only inert gases? What happens if you add other gases?

MadisonB
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Inert Gas

Postby MadisonB » Fri Jan 18, 2019 2:44 am

When inert gas is added to a system in equilibrium when pressure is kept constant, the volume will increases and moles on either side will shift. Conversely, if an inert gas is added to a system in equilibrium where volume is kept constant, the pressure will increase but the concentrations will not change, and thus equilibrium will be maintained.

Celine Cheng 1H
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:21 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Inert Gas

Postby Celine Cheng 1H » Fri Jan 18, 2019 2:56 am

If another gas is added that is actually part of the reaction, then the partial pressure of that gas increases, and you'll have to use le Chatelier's principle to see how the system has changed and whether it will favor the reactants or products to reach equilibrium again.

I've personally never come across a problem that asks what would happen if another gas that isn't part of the reaction is added and it isn't inert. However, I think that you might have to see if it'll react with the reactants or products? I'll assume that it'll decrease the amounts of one of them, and we can apply le Chatelier's off of that? I'm not sure though sorry!

LedaKnowles2E
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Inert Gas

Postby LedaKnowles2E » Fri Jan 18, 2019 9:47 am

When you double the pressure of the gases in a reaction by halving the volume, it increases the concentration of the gases, which pushes the reaction left or right depending on the moles of gas on either side.

However, when you double the pressure by adding an inert gas, it doesn't change the concentration of the gases involved in the reaction, so nothing happens.


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