Le Chateliers Principle

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katherinemurk 2B
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Joined: Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:02 am

Le Chateliers Principle

Postby katherinemurk 2B » Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:12 pm

How does the affect of temperature and pressure differ when it comes to changing the equilibrium?

Alyssa Wilson 2A
Posts: 47
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:18 pm

Re: Le Chateliers Principle

Postby Alyssa Wilson 2A » Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:18 pm

When a forward reaction is exothermic and is at equilibrium, increasing the temperature decreases the value of the equilibrium constant (k). If the forward reaction is endothermic, increasing the temperature increases the value of the equilibrium constant (k). When pressure increases, the equilibrium will shifts towards the side of the reaction with fewer moles of gas. When there is a decrease in pressure, the equilibrium shifts towards the side of the reaction that contains more moles of gas.

Mariana Fuentes 4l
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Joined: Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Le Chateliers Principle

Postby Mariana Fuentes 4l » Sun Jan 20, 2019 3:56 pm

Changing the temperature will affect the equilibrium constant. When temperature increases the Kp decreases. The pressure doesn't necessarily change the equilibrium constant due to the position of equilibrium changes to maintain the constant value.

Karyn Nguyen 1K
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 10:04 am

Re: Le Chateliers Principle

Postby Karyn Nguyen 1K » Sun Jan 20, 2019 5:08 pm



What happens if we increase ? Increase ? Decrease ?

This was explained during lecture, but I'm still a little confused. Can someone explain this to me again?

Sydney Tay 2B
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Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:20 pm

Re: Le Chateliers Principle

Postby Sydney Tay 2B » Sun Jan 20, 2019 5:12 pm

Karyn Nguyen 1K wrote:

What happens if we increase ? Increase ? Decrease ?

This was explained during lecture, but I'm still a little confused. Can someone explain this to me again?


Increasing reactants will push the chemical reaction in favor of the products, and increasing products will push the chemical reaction in favor of reactants. This happens because when you add a compound it needs to shift to the other side of the equation to maintain equilibrium. If H2 is removed, then the reaction will shift to the reactants to maintain equilibrium (because now there is an excess amount of products in comparison).


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