Inert gas effect on Equilibrium constant

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Milena Aragon 2B
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Inert gas effect on Equilibrium constant

Postby Milena Aragon 2B » Sun Jan 20, 2019 5:41 pm

Hi I'm still a little unclear as to why an inert gas will not effect the equilibrium constant despite increasing the pressure (when the volume is constant), and was wondering if someone could please explain the concept behind that. Thank you.

Rachana Jayaraman 1H
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Inert gas effect on Equilibrium constant

Postby Rachana Jayaraman 1H » Sun Jan 20, 2019 6:04 pm

The inert gas doesn't react with the reactants and products that are at equilibrium. As a result, the concentration of the products and reactants is still the same and the K value is constant.

Soumya Ravichandran 4H
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Inert gas effect on Equilibrium constant

Postby Soumya Ravichandran 4H » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:05 am

Pressure, even when volume is changed, will not change your equilibrium constant, K. Temperature is the only physical parameter that can change K, concentration and pressure can shift the direction to which the equilibrium will go towards, but they will not change K.

Timothy_Yueh_4L
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Inert gas effect on Equilibrium constant

Postby Timothy_Yueh_4L » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:33 am

The reason inert gases don't affect the equilibrium of a reaction is because it has no affect on the pressure due to the law of gases regarding the volume of gas particles are negligible.

jessicahe4Elavelle
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Inert gas effect on Equilibrium constant

Postby jessicahe4Elavelle » Mon Jan 21, 2019 1:41 am

The only factor that can change the equilibrium constant is temperature. Pressure can not change Equilibrium constant but it changes the direction of the reaction only if the change in pressure was caused by a change in volume because in that case there was a change in concentration.


Return to “Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest