Page 1 of 1

Change in temp

Posted: Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:36 am
by melissa_dis4K
I am confused on increasing and decreasing the temperature of an endothermic reaction. Why does decreasing the temperature favor the reactant? I thought that it always favored the endothermic (requiring heat) reaction.

Re: Change in temp

Posted: Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:49 am
by Nicolette_Canlian_2L
Since the reaction requires heat, decreasing the temp would make it difficult for the reaction to take place. For this reason, the reaction shifts towards the reactants to form more heat necessary to carry out the reaction.

Re: Change in temp

Posted: Fri Jan 25, 2019 5:52 pm
by Sean Reyes 1J
Because in an endothermic reaction, heat is used to form the product, you can essentially treat heat as a reactant. Decreasing the amount of heat means you are decreasing the amount of reactants, and thus the equilibrium would favor the direction of the reverse reaction.
Also, like already stated, this creates heat to allow the forward reaction rate to increase and then match that of the reverse reaction.

Re: Change in temp

Posted: Fri Jan 25, 2019 7:19 pm
by Andrew Bennecke
According to Le Chatelier's Principle, a system will always attempt to minimize the effects of a perturbation. Because of this, when the temperature is increased, it will favor the side without heat (reactants in an exothermic reaction and products in an endothermic reaction) in order to generate less heat. While there still will be a change in the Equilibrium constant after applying heat to the system, less heat is being input to the system by favoring the side of the reaction without heat.