predicting effects

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Katherine Wu 1H
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predicting effects

Postby Katherine Wu 1H » Fri Jan 10, 2020 9:43 pm

The two air pollutants SO2 and NO2 can react in the atmosphere as follows:
SO2 (g) + NO2 (g) ⇌ SO3 (g) + NO (g)
Predict the effect of the following changes to the amount of NO when the reaction above has come to equilibrium in a stainless steel bulb equipped with entrants for chemicals.
i. the amount of NO2 is increased
ii. the SO3 is removed by condensation
iii. the pressure is tripled by pumping in helium

the answer given was: i. increase in NO, ii. increase in NO, iii. no effect on NO
I'm confused as to why the removal of SO3 would result in an increase in NO (in ii.)?

Diana_Diep2I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: predicting effects

Postby Diana_Diep2I » Fri Jan 10, 2020 9:50 pm

I think because it's on the products side, removing one of the products would increase the production of both compounds (NO and SO3)?

Amanda Lin 2I
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: predicting effects

Postby Amanda Lin 2I » Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:03 pm

Removing some of the product will cause the reaction to make more product in order to reach equilibrium again.

Tahlia Mullins
Posts: 105
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: predicting effects

Postby Tahlia Mullins » Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:33 pm

Removing some product would in turn lead to the reaction proceeding to the right and more products being formed.

CynthiaLy4F
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: predicting effects

Postby CynthiaLy4F » Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:35 pm

Removing SO3 would result in an increase of NO because the reaction will try to make more product to minimize the effect of that change.

ABombino_2J
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: predicting effects

Postby ABombino_2J » Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:42 pm

Removing SO3 will lead to increase in not only NO but also SO3 because when the products are removed the reactants are favored, which means the reaction must shift to the left to once again reach equilibrium to accommodate for the higher concentration of the reactants.

Noe BM 1J
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Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:17 am

Re: predicting effects

Postby Noe BM 1J » Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:52 pm

The way I think about it is that if you remove SO3, NO will increase because it has to make up for the SO3 that's being removed in order for the reaction to be at equilibrium.

Alondra
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:15 am

Re: predicting effects

Postby Alondra » Sun Jan 12, 2020 8:24 pm

The amount of NO2 is increased because the system will try to reach equilibrium. After removing one product there is essentially more reactants than products, which I beleive causes the forward reaction to be favored.

saigorijavolu2k
Posts: 108
Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2019 12:15 am

Re: predicting effects

Postby saigorijavolu2k » Sun Jan 12, 2020 8:37 pm

Removing a product will cause the product concentration to increase because the reaction goes in the forward direction to make up for this product removal

ramiro_romero
Posts: 90
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

Re: predicting effects

Postby ramiro_romero » Mon Mar 09, 2020 6:23 pm

You wrote the question for ii wrong. The question asks what will happen to the amount of NO2 if SO2 is removed by condensation (both these compounds are products of the rxn). Removing SO2 requires the rxn to move forward (favoring and producing further product) to return to equilibrium.


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