5.35

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Sara Richmond 2K
Posts: 96
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

5.35

Postby Sara Richmond 2K » Sat Jan 11, 2020 4:46 pm

Please explain how to do this problem? I do not even know where to begin. or how to read the graph?
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Screen Shot 2020-01-11 at 4.45.15 PM.png

Ashley Tran 2I
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Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: 5.35

Postby Ashley Tran 2I » Sat Jan 11, 2020 8:14 pm

Set up an ICE table and fill in the info you are given by reading the initial and equilibrium partial pressures of each compound. Then you can work out the change amount. From there, to write the chemical equation, determine if there is a ratio between the amount of change of A and the amount of change of B and C. This would indicate coefficient(s) needed in the chemical equation. To find the K value, use the equilibrium partial pressures and products divided by reactants and include the coefficient(s) of the compounds by raising the partial pressure value to that power.

Shail Avasthi 3C
Posts: 81
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: 5.35

Postby Shail Avasthi 3C » Sat Jan 11, 2020 8:51 pm

Create an ICE table using the initial and final values for A B and C in the table. Then plug these values into the K expression.

Sara Richmond 2K
Posts: 96
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 5.35

Postby Sara Richmond 2K » Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:32 am

Thank you both.

I have one more question regarding this problem. I've included both my work and the answer key's work for finding the equilibrium constant. My question is "How would I have known to divide by 100 when finding the equilibrium constant?"
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Screen Shot 2020-01-14 at 10.31.45 AM.png
Screen Shot 2020-01-14 at 10.31.32 AM.png

AlyssaYeh_1B
Posts: 81
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 5.35

Postby AlyssaYeh_1B » Wed Jan 15, 2020 6:13 pm

The given values are in kPa, so you have to convert them to bar. 1 Pa = 1x10-5 bar, OR this can be written as 100 kPa = 1 bar. That's why you have to divide the values by 100 when you're plugging into the equilibrium constant :)


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