Chatelier's Principle

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Alexis Robles 2k
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Chatelier's Principle

Postby Alexis Robles 2k » Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:41 pm

What is Chatelier's Principle and when do we use it?

chrisleung-2J
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Re: Chatelier's Principle

Postby chrisleung-2J » Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:45 pm

Le Chatelier's Principle refers to the concept that equilibrium systems shift in order to partially counteract disturbances to the existing state of equilibrium.

Vuong_2F
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Re: Chatelier's Principle

Postby Vuong_2F » Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:53 pm

You typically use this principle if there is a scenario where equilibrium conditions are disturbed (whether it be by temperature, pressure, etc). Applying the principle will help you determine the effect of the change.

TarynD_1I
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Re: Chatelier's Principle

Postby TarynD_1I » Sun Jan 12, 2020 6:09 pm

Chatelier's Principle is, as Professor Lavelle said in class, chemical reactions adjusting to minimize the effect of change. This change usually refers to changing physical parameters of temperature, pressure, or concentration.

Sydney Pell 2E
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Re: Chatelier's Principle

Postby Sydney Pell 2E » Sun Jan 12, 2020 6:17 pm

Chatelier's principle can be used to see which direction a reaction will proceed in response to a change in concentration or pressure. For example, if more reactants are added, therefore increasing concentration, Le Chatelier's principle tells us that the reaction will move forward in order to minimize the effects of this concentration change.

Nick Lewis 4F
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Re: Chatelier's Principle

Postby Nick Lewis 4F » Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:42 pm

Sydney Pell 2E wrote:Chatelier's principle can be used to see which direction a reaction will proceed in response to a change in concentration or pressure. For example, if more reactants are added, therefore increasing concentration, Le Chatelier's principle tells us that the reaction will move forward in order to minimize the effects of this concentration change.

I think thats a pretty accurate explanation. An example of this is when you are comparing pressure, you look at the total number of moles of reactants vs products. If the total number of moles of products is greater than reactants, equilibrium lies the left, and when reactants are more plentiful than products, equilibrium lies to the right.

Adam Kramer 1A
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Re: Chatelier's Principle

Postby Adam Kramer 1A » Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:12 am

Nick Lewis 4F wrote:
Sydney Pell 2E wrote:Chatelier's principle can be used to see which direction a reaction will proceed in response to a change in concentration or pressure. For example, if more reactants are added, therefore increasing concentration, Le Chatelier's principle tells us that the reaction will move forward in order to minimize the effects of this concentration change.

I think thats a pretty accurate explanation. An example of this is when you are comparing pressure, you look at the total number of moles of reactants vs products. If the total number of moles of products is greater than reactants, equilibrium lies the left, and when reactants are more plentiful than products, equilibrium lies to the right.

I think this is slightly inaccurate. You don't look at the moles but rather the concentrations of the products and reactants. This is how you tell where the equilibrium lies.

Eunice Nguyen 4I
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Re: Chatelier's Principle

Postby Eunice Nguyen 4I » Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:19 am

Le Chatelier's Principle states that chemical reactions adjust so as to minimize the effect of changes. You normally use this for when changes occur to the reaction.


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