Kw

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AGaeta_2C
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Kw

Postby AGaeta_2C » Tue Jan 14, 2020 9:34 pm

Is Kw the equilibrium constant for water or the ionization constant?

cassidysong 1K
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Kw

Postby cassidysong 1K » Tue Jan 14, 2020 9:55 pm

Kw is the equilibrium constant.

Daria Azizad 1K
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Kw

Postby Daria Azizad 1K » Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:12 pm

Both, as they refer to the same thing.

Kate Swertfager
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Kw

Postby Kate Swertfager » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:22 am

Equilibrium constant and ionization constant of water are the same thing in this case.

Jaci Glassick 2G
Posts: 83
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Kw

Postby Jaci Glassick 2G » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:00 am

Both. They are the same thing.

Jasmine Vallarta 2L
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Kw

Postby Jasmine Vallarta 2L » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:19 am

Kw = 1.0 x 10^-14

Caroline Beecher 2H
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Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:21 am

Re: Kw

Postby Caroline Beecher 2H » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:43 pm

Kw refers to the equilibrium constant for water and/or the ionization constant. Also as Dr. Lavelle discussed further today in class, for acids you can call it the acidity, ionization, or dissociation constant.

405318478
Posts: 62
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Kw

Postby 405318478 » Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:14 am

In lecture Lavelle said that Kw is a constant, 1.0 x 10^-14. I'm looking at a homework problem, and it gives kw as 2.1 x 10^-14, could someone clarify the meaning of the value of Kw? The homework question im referring to is 6A.21

Max Madrzyk Dis 4G
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Kw

Postby Max Madrzyk Dis 4G » Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:33 am

Kw is a constant and I believe and it is the equilibrium constant for water and it equals 1.0x10^-14.

Zoe Gleason 4F
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Kw

Postby Zoe Gleason 4F » Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:38 pm

405318478 wrote:In lecture Lavelle said that Kw is a constant, 1.0 x 10^-14. I'm looking at a homework problem, and it gives kw as 2.1 x 10^-14, could someone clarify the meaning of the value of Kw? The homework question im referring to is 6A.21

In that problem, the Kw is different because it was found at a different temperature. The value from Kw in class is at 25C. A change in temperature will result in a change of K.

Jasmine Fendi 1D
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Kw

Postby Jasmine Fendi 1D » Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:17 pm

They are the same thing, and Kw=Ka*Kb=10^-14

504939134
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Kw

Postby 504939134 » Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:13 pm

They both essentially mean the same thing, and you can use them interchangeably.

Madeline Phan 1E
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Kw

Postby Madeline Phan 1E » Fri Jan 17, 2020 8:34 am

Kw is the equilibrium constant for water.

Omar Selim 1D
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Kw

Postby Omar Selim 1D » Fri Jan 17, 2020 9:12 am

Kw = 1.0 *10^-14 is the equilibrium constant for water, which is also defined as Kw = Ka * Kb. The two definitions you gave are interchangeable for the most part

Nathan Rothschild_2D
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Kw

Postby Nathan Rothschild_2D » Fri Jan 17, 2020 3:54 pm

Kw is the equilibrium constant for water and at 25 C is 10^(-14), but if the equation doesn't specify the temperature, can we assume that the reaction is taking place at 25 C?

705121606
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Kw

Postby 705121606 » Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:04 pm

They are the same value, just keep in mind that this value changes at different given temperatures. The one we use most often is 1.0 x10-14 at 25C.

705121606
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Kw

Postby 705121606 » Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:06 pm

Nathan Rothschild_2D wrote:Kw is the equilibrium constant for water and at 25 C is 10^(-14), but if the equation doesn't specify the temperature, can we assume that the reaction is taking place at 25 C?


I believe so, if it was at a different temperature, that temperature would have to be specified.


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