Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions Class Example

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Matthew Chan 1B
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Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions Class Example

Postby Matthew Chan 1B » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:00 am

I was wondering if someone could help explain the example that Dr. Lavelle gave in class when discussing the reaction from N2 to 2N. I understand that N2 is more stable and therefore it is favored, but then how does that make the reaction endothermic? Thanks!

Justin Sarquiz 2F
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Re: Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions Class Example

Postby Justin Sarquiz 2F » Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:58 am

This reaction is breaking the N2 bond to form 2N atoms. Breaking bonds require heat making this reaction endothermic.

Anisha Chandra 1K
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Re: Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions Class Example

Postby Anisha Chandra 1K » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:29 pm

Since N2 is more stable, it's triple bond is pretty strong. Breaking that bond requires the addition of heat, while forming bonds releases heat. In this example, the product has a higher enthalpy (or energy) so the enthalpy change is positive, and thus, the reaction is exothermic.

Astrid Lunde 1I
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Re: Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions Class Example

Postby Astrid Lunde 1I » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:31 pm

The N2 bonds are broken which requires heat making it an endothermic reaction.

Veronica_Lubera_2A
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Re: Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions Class Example

Postby Veronica_Lubera_2A » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:33 pm

A good mnemonic to remember this is BARF which stands for Breaking-Absorbing; Release- Form. So breaking bonds needs to absorb energy and forming bonds releases energy.

Angela Prince 1J
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Re: Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions Class Example

Postby Angela Prince 1J » Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:01 pm

N2 is more stable in that it has a triple bond. energy is always required to break bonds and released to make bonds. since the N2 bonds must be broken, it is an endothermic reaction.


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