Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure

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Andrew F 2L
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Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure

Postby Andrew F 2L » Sat Jan 18, 2020 10:19 pm

Can someone help me understand why the side with more molecules necessarily refers to more pressure? Is it just because those molecules are taking up more space? I think i am just confused with the concept of pressure in general. Thank you!

Shutong Hou_1F
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Re: Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure

Postby Shutong Hou_1F » Sat Jan 18, 2020 10:42 pm

According to the ideal gas law, PV = nRT, P = nRT/V = concentration (=n/V) * RT. So [partial pressure = concentration * RT].

Kayla Maldonado 1C
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Re: Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure

Postby Kayla Maldonado 1C » Sat Jan 18, 2020 10:52 pm

Shutong Hou_1F wrote:According to the ideal gas law, PV = nRT, P = nRT/V = concentration (=n/V) * RT. So [partial pressure = concentration * RT].

The way I see it is concentration is moles per liter which means the more moles, the higher the Molarity or Concentration, and as said in the comment above, partial pressure = concentration * RT (R being a constant and T being the temperature) so the larger the concentration, the more partial pressure.

Aarja Pavade 1H
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Re: Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure

Postby Aarja Pavade 1H » Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:12 pm

More molecules would essentially mean less volume. The more particles you add into an empty flask, the less empty space there is. Since there is less volume, the pressure in the flask will increase. This is demonstrated through the inverse relationship between pressure and volume and the equation P=nRT/V.

Ashley Wang 4G
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Re: Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure

Postby Ashley Wang 4G » Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:50 pm

When there are more molecules, the particles collide with one another and the container more frequently, resulting in higher pressure. Thus, when applied to Le Chatelier's, if the pressure of the system is increased, the reaction will shift in a direction that will alleviate this added pressure, which would be in the direction that produces less moles of gas.

Diana A 2L
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Re: Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure

Postby Diana A 2L » Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:02 am

In lecture Professor Lavelle said that you can increase pressure by decreasing volume, but then he also said you can increase pressure in some other way. How else can you increase pressure in a system? Would increasing concentration achieve that based on the comments in this post. Thank you.

Natalie Benitez 1E
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Re: Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure

Postby Natalie Benitez 1E » Mon Jan 20, 2020 11:54 am

How does Le Chatliers Principle apply to the concept of pressure?


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