Endothermic vs. exothermic

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Emily Vainberg 1D
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Endothermic vs. exothermic

Postby Emily Vainberg 1D » Sun Jan 19, 2020 12:13 pm

In endothermic reactions (h= +), when temperature increases which direction does the equilibrium shift towards?

William Chan 1D
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Endothermic vs. exothermic

Postby William Chan 1D » Sun Jan 19, 2020 12:18 pm

If a reaction is endothermic, it means it absorbs heat when the reaction proceeds forward. Adding more heat allows more forward reactions to occur, shifting the equilibrium to the right.

It something helps to think of heat as a reactant in this case, where, according to Le Chatlier's principle, adding more heat would cause the reaction to shift toward the right.

Robert Tran 1B
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Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Endothermic vs. exothermic

Postby Robert Tran 1B » Sun Jan 19, 2020 12:52 pm

The equilibrium will shift towards the right. This is because endothermic reactions take up heat, so forming more products would lessen the effect of the increase in temperature.

RasikaObla_4I
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Endothermic vs. exothermic

Postby RasikaObla_4I » Sun Jan 19, 2020 1:49 pm

When the temperature increases and the reaction is endothermic, the amount of reactants increases, so to balance out to equilibrium, the reaction will shift towards the products.

105335337
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Endothermic vs. exothermic

Postby 105335337 » Sun Jan 19, 2020 1:52 pm

In an endothermic reaction, heat is technically considered a reactant because it takes heat to cause the reaction to occur.. So I we add more reactant, it will force equilibrium to shift to the right, creating more product.

Lauren Stack 1C
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Endothermic vs. exothermic

Postby Lauren Stack 1C » Sun Jan 19, 2020 2:35 pm

With endothermic reactions, I think of heat as a reactant. Thus, if you apply the logic learned with Le Chatelier's principle, the equilibrium will shift to the right, just as it would if you had added a chemical reactant.


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