biological examples

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RRahimtoola1I
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

biological examples

Postby RRahimtoola1I » Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:04 pm

The following is stated on Outline 1 as things we have to know...

"Biological examples. For example: ATP hydrolysis; osmotic pressure"

Can anyone tell me what we have to know about it because I don't recall going over this?

Parker Smith
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: biological examples

Postby Parker Smith » Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:21 pm

I think this asks us to know about the production of ATP and its use. For example, ATP is less stable than its conjugate component, ADP. Therefore, it requires energy to make ATP, an endothermic process. I believe that's the point of the "biological examples"

Viviana Velasquez
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: biological examples

Postby Viviana Velasquez » Sun Jan 26, 2020 6:50 pm

I don't remember going over this either. I feel like he might have specifically gone over it in class since that is what he did last quarter in 14A.

Shutong Hou_1F
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: biological examples

Postby Shutong Hou_1F » Sat Feb 01, 2020 12:11 am

In addition, ATP is less stable than ADP, because ATP has an additional phosphate group that is connected to the other part of the ATP by a chemical bond with very high energy.

Michelle N - 2C
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: biological examples

Postby Michelle N - 2C » Sun Feb 02, 2020 1:28 am

First, thank you for explaining the ATP part of the biological examples. :) Can someone explain the same for osmotic pressures?

Frank He 4G
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Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:19 am

Re: biological examples

Postby Frank He 4G » Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:15 pm

Michelle N - 2C wrote:First, thank you for explaining the ATP part of the biological examples. :) Can someone explain the same for osmotic pressures?

I'm not sure we went over this either, but osmotic pressure is basically the pressure needed so that water doesn't pass through a membrane. It's calculated using the concentration of solute, so anything that changes the concentration could have an effect on the osmotic pressure (higher concentration of solute means higher osmotic pressure means more pressure is needed to prevent water from flowing through the membrane to the side with the higher concentration of solute).

Michelle N - 2C
Posts: 117
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: biological examples

Postby Michelle N - 2C » Fri Feb 07, 2020 10:51 am

Frank He 4G wrote:
Michelle N - 2C wrote:First, thank you for explaining the ATP part of the biological examples. :) Can someone explain the same for osmotic pressures?

I'm not sure we went over this either, but osmotic pressure is basically the pressure needed so that water doesn't pass through a membrane. It's calculated using the concentration of solute, so anything that changes the concentration could have an effect on the osmotic pressure (higher concentration of solute means higher osmotic pressure means more pressure is needed to prevent water from flowing through the membrane to the side with the higher concentration of solute).


Alright, that makes much more sense now. Thank you so much!

Lizette Noriega 1H
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:15 am

Re: biological examples

Postby Lizette Noriega 1H » Fri Feb 07, 2020 3:55 pm

Are these biological examples going to be on the midterm?


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