Increase in Pressure

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austin-3b
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Increase in Pressure

Postby austin-3b » Wed Jan 13, 2021 7:52 pm

For increases in pressure (decreases in volume), the reaction goes toward the side with less moles. When finding out which side has the least amount of moles, do you also include aqueous solutions or only gases?

Megan Chan 3A
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Megan Chan 3A » Wed Jan 13, 2021 7:58 pm

This only applies to reactions with gases, so I don't believe there would be any problems involving a change in pressure with aqueous solutions.

Laura 3l
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Laura 3l » Wed Jan 13, 2021 8:18 pm

I believe this only applies to gases.

Sheryl Ocampo 1D
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Sheryl Ocampo 1D » Wed Jan 13, 2021 8:30 pm

I'm pretty sure you only consider moles of gases

Tracey Huynh 2F
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Tracey Huynh 2F » Wed Jan 13, 2021 9:06 pm

Like the others have said, changes in pressure that affect volume only applies to gases since changes in pressure don't have an impact/affect liquids or solids, so aqueous species would also be unaffected since they're not gases, but rather a chemical species that has been dissolved in water. A question that shows this as an example is 5.61 in the textbook. Hope this helps!

Malakai Espinosa 3E
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Malakai Espinosa 3E » Wed Jan 13, 2021 9:08 pm

Pressure only applies to molecules in the gas phase.

Vanessa Perez
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Vanessa Perez » Wed Jan 13, 2021 10:18 pm

Pressure is a measurement to describe gases, therefore only consider moles of gases

Katie Nye 2F
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Katie Nye 2F » Wed Jan 13, 2021 10:21 pm

Pressure with a change in volume will always only be applicable to gases. In order to use Le Chatelier's principle that it will balance out pressure, the substances need to be gaseous.

Serena Song 1A
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Serena Song 1A » Wed Jan 13, 2021 10:54 pm

Pressure only applies to gases, especially in the context of volume changing. The volume of aqueous solutions can't change, but the volume of gases can.

Joseph Hsing 2C
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Joseph Hsing 2C » Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:11 pm

Pressure is associated with gasses, and something can only have a concentration if it is dissolved in a solvent.

Kelly Tran 1J
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Kelly Tran 1J » Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:16 pm

Increasing pressure (by decreasing volume) only applies to gases because for liquids and solids, changing the pressure does not change the volume. Therefore, you would only consider the moles of gases.

Akriti Ratti 1H
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Akriti Ratti 1H » Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:26 pm

Hi! Pressure is only applicable to gases so that's all you'd consider.

Lorraine Jiang 2C
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Lorraine Jiang 2C » Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:09 am

Hi! I believe increasing/decreasing pressure in a reaction system only has an effect on gases.

Hope it helps!

Tiao Tan 3C
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Tiao Tan 3C » Thu Jan 14, 2021 1:27 am

This only applies to gases. Liquid pressure has very little association with volume.

Danielle DIS2L
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Danielle DIS2L » Sun Jan 17, 2021 10:57 pm

you would only consider the moles of gases, not the liquid and solids

rhettfarmer-3H
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby rhettfarmer-3H » Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:40 pm

It only applies to gasses so don't worry about in another context. Also, it follows the least moles. One of the crazier ideas is if the moles are the same is that there is no direct change rather it just decrease equally.

Chudi Onyedika 3A
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Chudi Onyedika 3A » Sat Jan 23, 2021 3:55 pm

Changing the pressure would only affect gases.

Pranav Daggubati 3C
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Pranav Daggubati 3C » Sat Jan 23, 2021 3:56 pm

In these problems, you don't consider anything in a non-gaseous state because it doesn't affect the gas pressure of the system.

Scot Widjaja Dis 1J
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Scot Widjaja Dis 1J » Sun Jan 24, 2021 1:27 am

Only moles of gases

Presley Gao 2C
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Presley Gao 2C » Sun Jan 24, 2021 4:35 pm

When finding out which side has the least amount of moles, you only include gases, but not aqueous solutions.

Bella Bursulaya 3G
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Bella Bursulaya 3G » Sun Jan 24, 2021 4:40 pm

Gases because they are the only ones that have partial pressures. Aqueous, liquids, and solids do not have partial pressures so increasing the system's pressure won't do anything to them or their concentrations.

josephspindler2H
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby josephspindler2H » Sun Jan 24, 2021 4:55 pm

I believe this would only be for gases rather than aqueous substances. Changing the pressure would only affect the moles of gas.

jasmineculilap_3F
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby jasmineculilap_3F » Sun Jan 24, 2021 4:56 pm

Changing pressure only affects gases, so you don't include aqueous.

Maddie Turk Disc 2J
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Maddie Turk Disc 2J » Sun Jan 24, 2021 5:14 pm

So how do you calculate which side has the greater number of moles?

Gustavo_Chavez_1K
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Gustavo_Chavez_1K » Sun Jan 24, 2021 5:58 pm

This would only apply to gases, not liquids

Mingzi Yang 1E
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Mingzi Yang 1E » Sun Jan 24, 2021 6:02 pm

Changes in pressure affect reactions with gases.

Kiana Tashakori 1D
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Kiana Tashakori 1D » Sun Jan 24, 2021 6:16 pm

You don't include aqueous solutions because pressure changes only apply to/change gasses.

haley f
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby haley f » Sun Jan 24, 2021 6:40 pm

You would only need to consider the gases! He mentioned in class that we can't really give enough pressure to change the volume of solids and liquids in this course so we don't consider it!

Bryan Le 2K
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Bryan Le 2K » Sun Jan 24, 2021 8:01 pm

When looking at changes in pressures in relation to the chemical reaction, you would like at the moles of the gases only.

Britney Tran IJ
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Britney Tran IJ » Sun Jan 24, 2021 10:03 pm

pressure changes applies to gases

AlbertGu_2C
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby AlbertGu_2C » Sun Jan 24, 2021 10:11 pm

You would only count gases, and there should not be any questions with this in it if it has other things that are not gases

Ariel Guan 1H
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Re: Increase in Pressure

Postby Ariel Guan 1H » Tue Jan 26, 2021 2:35 pm

you should only consider gases for pressure changes.


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