Long term vs short term changes in conc.

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Charlene D 3H
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Long term vs short term changes in conc.

Postby Charlene D 3H » Thu Jan 14, 2021 3:50 pm

When asked to find the effects of adding more product or reactant to a reaction, will we be told whether we're analyzing changes in the long or short term or should we assume that it is one way or the other?

And just for clarification: say we had one reactant in an equation. if it's in the short term, would we just say that adding a reactant would result in more reactant and if it were the long term, there would be a decrease in reactant?

Thank you in advance! (:

darchen3G
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Re: Long term vs short term changes in conc.

Postby darchen3G » Thu Jan 14, 2021 4:38 pm

We almost always talk about long term changes.

Isabella Chou 1A
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Re: Long term vs short term changes in conc.

Postby Isabella Chou 1A » Thu Jan 14, 2021 6:58 pm

I think you are correct! Adding a reactant results in an increase in that reactant after a short period of time. But in the long term, the reaction proceeds towards the formation of the products, meaning that there is a decrease in that reactant.

Madison Muggeo 3H
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Re: Long term vs short term changes in conc.

Postby Madison Muggeo 3H » Thu Jan 14, 2021 9:05 pm

My TA addressed this in our session last week, and I think your explanation is correct! :)

Tessa House 3A
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Re: Long term vs short term changes in conc.

Postby Tessa House 3A » Thu Jan 14, 2021 9:10 pm

I think that you are correct in that immediately there will be a significant increase in the amount of reactant, but as the reaction proceeds, it is used up to form product. However, I think there is still more reactant than before because if it all went to form product, the concentration of product would be too high. For either a short term or long term change, the reactant concentration is higher than it was originally.

aashmi_agrawal_3d
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Re: Long term vs short term changes in conc.

Postby aashmi_agrawal_3d » Fri Jan 15, 2021 10:55 am

I think we usually refer to the long term change because the question is already stating the short term change.

Olivia Monroy 1A
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Re: Long term vs short term changes in conc.

Postby Olivia Monroy 1A » Fri Jan 15, 2021 11:27 am

Agree with what's said above when adding reactant there's initially more reactant (which is literally explained by the adding of reactant) but with time it's observed to form more product, with both the reactant and product concentration higher after adding more reactant. *Equilibrium concentration only changes with temperature.


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