Using electronegativity to determine acidity

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Emilie Hoffman 1E
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Using electronegativity to determine acidity

Postby Emilie Hoffman 1E » Sat Dec 09, 2017 3:10 pm

Is there a certain range of electronagativity differences that would guarantee that a compound is acidic or basic? Or for that matter what camn classify as amphoteric? In the book (12.17 specifically) asks us to determine whether or not a given oxide is acidic, basic, or amphoteric and I was unsure of how exactly to approach this problem without memorizing what compounds are automatically acids or bases.

Kevin Liu 3G
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Using electronegativity to determine acidity

Postby Kevin Liu 3G » Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:08 pm

Bases generally have a metal within them and acids generally have a nonmetal (HCl, HBr, HI). Amphoteric compounds generally have a metalloid with the exception of H2O i believe. Also, the higher up you move on the periodic table the less acidic something is (HI is more acidic than HCl).

Curtis Wong 2D
Posts: 62
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Using electronegativity to determine acidity

Postby Curtis Wong 2D » Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:09 pm

As for the reading from the textbook, on page 469 in Chapter 12.
"Metals typically form basic oxides and nonmetals typically form acidic oxides." And then they talk about the examples of amphoteric oxides.

Acidic strength, in one part, is determined by how weak the bonds are. The weaker the bond (longer=weaker), the stronger the acid. There's other factors as well.


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