What is considered a heavier alkaline earth base?

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jonathanmarilao2L
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Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

What is considered a heavier alkaline earth base?

Postby jonathanmarilao2L » Sat Nov 28, 2015 5:36 pm

In the course reader on page 151, there is a list of common acids and bases of which has some bases under hydroxides of the heavier alkaline earths? Are all alkaline metals past calcium considered heavier? And are just beryllium and magnesium just considered regular alkaline earth bases?

Anne Cam 3A
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Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: What is considered a heavier alkaline earth base?

Postby Anne Cam 3A » Sat Nov 28, 2015 8:18 pm

Alkaline earth metals past calcium are considered heavier because of their molar mass. The most likely reason for radium not being part of the base-forming metals is its reactivity; its compounds are very short-lived and unstable.

Beryllium and magnesium are lighter in comparison, but beryllium forms amphoteric oxides like other metals (aluminum, gallium) on the boundary between metals and nonmetals. Magnesium hydroxide has a very low solubility in water, so it cannot form strong basic aqueous solutions. Magnesium oxide is also a weak base because the oxide ions are more strongly bonded than in other oxides.


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