How to determine amphoteric compounds

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Jennifer1E
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:39 am

How to determine amphoteric compounds

Postby Jennifer1E » Sat Jul 29, 2017 8:01 pm

How can we tell if a compound is amphoteric? What characteristics can we look for to determine that its amphoteric?

Sarah_Wilen
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:39 am
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Re: How to determine amphoteric compounds

Postby Sarah_Wilen » Sun Jul 30, 2017 12:05 pm

The definition of amphoteric is a species that is able to act as both a base and acid, which means it should be able to accept and donate a proton when need be.

Well, for one example, we know that water is amphoteric...
amphoteric2-1.png


Examples:
H2O can become H3O+ or OH-.
HCO3- can become CO3^2- or H2CO3.
HSO4- can become H2SO4 or SO4^2-.

Do you see the trend-ish?

Kyle Alves 3K
Posts: 46
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:01 am

Re: How to determine amphoteric compounds

Postby Kyle Alves 3K » Fri Dec 08, 2017 3:40 pm

Also, the easiest way to remember is if the elements in question are part of the metalloid oxides section of the periodic table
as opposed to the nonmetal oxides (group p) which are acidic and the metal oxides (group 1 and 2) that are basic

McKenna disc 1C
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: How to determine amphoteric compounds

Postby McKenna disc 1C » Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:09 pm

Sarah's answer is great.
I have in my notes that amphoteric means that it can react with both acids and bases, whereas amphiprotic means that it can act as a proton donor or a proton acceptor (a Bronsted acid or a Bronsted base, respectively). I may be wrong, but I'm getting that Sarah's answer describes amphiprotic character rather than amphoteric?
If anyone could help me delineate further between the two (i.e., examples of both), that would be awesome.

Thanks!


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