Amphoteric characteristics

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PriscillaLi_3G
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2019 12:30 am

Amphoteric characteristics

Postby PriscillaLi_3G » Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:57 pm

What differentiates amphoteric compounds from acids and bases?

805394719
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Amphoteric characteristics

Postby 805394719 » Wed Nov 27, 2019 1:03 pm

Amphoteric molecules have the characteristics of both acids and bases. This means that they are able to act as acids or bases depending on the circumstances and what they are reacting with. Amphoteric substances are usually created by metalloids which also have the characteristics of both metals and nonmetals. Since nonmetals generally form acids, and metals generally form bases, metalloids which can act as both can act as both acids and bases.

Laura WM 3I
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Amphoteric characteristics

Postby Laura WM 3I » Wed Nov 27, 2019 2:00 pm

Like the previous post explains, metalloids usually form amphoteric compounds because they fall in between metals and non-metals (and therefore share characteristics/properties of both). Another good thing to remember is that water, H_2O, is amphoteric.

Esha Chawla 2E
Posts: 108
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Amphoteric characteristics

Postby Esha Chawla 2E » Wed Nov 27, 2019 2:19 pm

PriscillaLi_3G wrote:What differentiates amphoteric compounds from acids and bases?


We can also use the Bronsted and Lewis definitions of acids and bases to answer this question. So, for example, H2O is known to be amphoteric. It can act as a Bronsted acid OR base because it can either donate an H+ (to become OH-) or accept an H+ (to become H3O+) respectively. Similarly, it can act as a Lewis acid OR base, as it can either be an electron pair acceptor or an electron pair donor respectively.


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