Classifying Oxides as Amphoteric

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Abigail Urbina 1K
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Classifying Oxides as Amphoteric

Postby Abigail Urbina 1K » Mon Dec 04, 2017 9:32 pm

I understand that if an oxide is amphoteric, it can react with both acids and bases. However, how can you tell just by looking at a chemical formula whether that molecule will be amphoteric or not.

For example, in question 12.17d, how are you able to tell that Bi2O3 is amphoteric and not simply basic considering it is a metal oxide?

Mitch Mologne 1A
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Re: Classifying Oxides as Amphoteric

Postby Mitch Mologne 1A » Tue Dec 05, 2017 6:50 am

An easy way to tell is if the molecule has both an acidic functional group and an acidic functional group. For example, most amino acids will have both. Another easy way to tell is if when a conjugate base to an acid still has a hydrogen in the molecule. HCO3^- can both accept a proton and give on away.

Justin Chu 1G
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Re: Classifying Oxides as Amphoteric

Postby Justin Chu 1G » Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:09 am

Also, the diagonal strip of metalloids on the periodic table generally contain the elements that will form amphoteric compounds (however, NOT ALL).

Evelyn L 1H
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Re: Classifying Oxides as Amphoteric

Postby Evelyn L 1H » Tue Dec 05, 2017 11:49 am

Be, Al, Ga, Ge, As, In, Sn, Sb, Pb, Bi are elements that will form amphoteric compounds. This closely follows the metalloid band but not completely. Figure 12.7 on page 469 in the textbook shows this.


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