6th editions Fundamentals J #1

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Daniela Alvarado 3B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

6th editions Fundamentals J #1

Postby Daniela Alvarado 3B » Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:06 pm

can anyone explain why in part d. H2SO3 is an acid? and why in part e. Ca(OH)2 is a base? Thanks in advance.

Sara Lakamsani 4D
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: 6th editions Fundamentals J #1

Postby Sara Lakamsani 4D » Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:10 pm

I think it is because, in water, the H atoms in H2SO3 are likely to be attracted to the oxygen and form H3O whereas Ca(OH)2 dissociates into Ca and OH ions

arif_latif_2G
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: 6th editions Fundamentals J #1

Postby arif_latif_2G » Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:19 pm

There is a formula to calculate p: -log[H+], where you need to know the molarity of H+. Since you do not know the molarity, you can assume whatever molecule that will dissociate into H+ will be acids and ones that will dissociate into OH- will be bases. H2SO3 becomes 2H+ and SO3- and Ca(OH)2 becomes 2OH- and Ca2+.

jguiman4H
Posts: 31
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Re: 6th editions Fundamentals J #1

Postby jguiman4H » Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:25 pm

Recall that Bronsted acids are proton (or H+) donors, and that Bronsted bases are proton (or H+) acceptors.

I believe that H2SO3 can dissolve into sulfite ion and H+ ions, while Ca(OH)2 can dissolve into Ca2+ and OH-.

Thus, because H2SO3 can donate protons, it is a Lewis acid. And, because Ca(OH)2 can receive them using its OH-, it is a Lewis base.


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