Acids vs Basis

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Emilie_Paltrinieri_1K
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Acids vs Basis

Postby Emilie_Paltrinieri_1K » Sun Dec 06, 2020 2:44 pm

What are the main differences we should be looking for when recognizing acids or basis, looking at their formula and structure?

Arieanne De Guzman 2J
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby Arieanne De Guzman 2J » Sun Dec 06, 2020 2:58 pm

I definitely feel like the formulas would be the best way to distinguish between acids and bases. A good rule of thumb is that acid formulas start with an H and donate their proton, whereas base formulas end with OH and will accept a proton. I would say an expectation to this would be CH3COOH, acetic acid, which ends in OH but is an acid.

Emilie_Paltrinieri_1K wrote:What are the main differences we should be looking for when recognizing acids or basis, looking at their formula and structure?

Ryan_Kien_1L
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby Ryan_Kien_1L » Sun Dec 06, 2020 3:28 pm

I personally think that it depends on your definition of acids and bases (ie. Bronsted-Lowry, Lewis, Arrhenius). So the first thing you'd need to do is identify which definition you're looking for.

Ethan Goode 2H
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby Ethan Goode 2H » Sun Dec 06, 2020 3:51 pm

I think it would be useful to understand the general look of both acids and bases. If you are looking for lewis acids and bases, it would be in your best interest to draw out the Lewis structure to determine which is a Lewis acid and which is a base.

Simrah_Ahmed1J
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby Simrah_Ahmed1J » Sun Dec 06, 2020 4:03 pm

It depends on what kind of acid/base you're looking for but...
Obviously, if you have the full equation it will be easiest to determine based on the way the H+ and OH- move. It also helps to look at whether or not the molecule is an ion with a positive charge, in this case the molecule can usually easily loose an H, which is characteristic of an acid. For example, NH4+ is an acid because it can lose an H and become NH3.
Overall, it might help to think about whether the molecule can still have a stable form if it loses an H (sometimes with a negative charge). For example, we know that H2SO4is an acid because it can lose an H and become another stable molecule that we know of, HSO4[sup]-.

AlyssaMaynard1C
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby AlyssaMaynard1C » Sun Dec 06, 2020 4:04 pm

Ryan_Kien_1L wrote:I personally think that it depends on your definition of acids and bases (ie. Bronsted-Lowry, Lewis, Arrhenius). So the first thing you'd need to do is identify which definition you're looking for.

Make sure to pay attention to their characteristics as well, if they are a weak or strong acid/base.

Madisen Brown -1C
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby Madisen Brown -1C » Sun Dec 06, 2020 4:59 pm

I would say the identification of the acids and base (Lewis, Bronsted-Lowry, Arrhenius) and also keeping in mind important chracteristics

Kandyce Lance 3E
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby Kandyce Lance 3E » Sun Dec 06, 2020 5:14 pm

Ryan_Kien_1L wrote:I personally think that it depends on your definition of acids and bases (ie. Bronsted-Lowry, Lewis, Arrhenius). So the first thing you'd need to do is identify which definition you're looking for.


Do you mind writing out those definitions please?

Jaclyn Schwartz 1I
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby Jaclyn Schwartz 1I » Sun Dec 06, 2020 6:02 pm

My rule of thumb is usually look at the formula. If it starts with H, it's most likely an acid because it will be the electron pair receptor. Bases might have an OH in them as an electron pair donor. If that doesn't get you an answer, look at the structures and see which would be donating an electron or H+ and which would accept that and that will help you figure out which is which.

Jolie Sukonik 2B
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby Jolie Sukonik 2B » Sun Dec 06, 2020 9:50 pm

Usually, if the formula contains an H it will be an acid, for example, HCl. If it contains an OH (also known as an alcohol group) it is most likely a base. H ionizes to H+ and is an electron acceptor. OH ionizes to OH- and is an electron donor.

edward_brodell_2I
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby edward_brodell_2I » Sun Dec 06, 2020 9:58 pm

Acids and bases can be thought of in terms of ionization/electrolyte properties. There are measures of pOH and pH so certain molecules will raise or reduce these concentrations of OH- or H+. Some substance can bond to OH- or H+ or they can ionize and add more OH- or H+ to the solution. HNO3 gives H+ and NO3 - so since it adds to the H+ concentration, it is an acid. There is also definitions in terms of lone pair acceptors and donors which work in the same way of adding charged ions or removing them from solution.

David Liu 1E
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Re: Acids vs Basis

Postby David Liu 1E » Mon Dec 07, 2020 4:00 pm

I agree with a lot of the responses mentioning that you most likely have to look at the definitions of what you want but a rule of thumb would be to look at the H and OH groups at the ends of the compound


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