sapling #6

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Shreya Patel- 2D
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sapling #6

Postby Shreya Patel- 2D » Sun Dec 06, 2020 7:10 pm

Why is CH3COOH an acid and not a base? It has an OH group so I'm confused as to why it isn't a base.

Leo Naylor 2F
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Leo Naylor 2F » Sun Dec 06, 2020 7:13 pm

The COOH group gives away a proton in the form of a positively charged hydrogen atom, which makes it an acid.

Lillian Ma 1I
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Lillian Ma 1I » Sun Dec 06, 2020 7:14 pm

CH3COOH has a carboxyl group COOH which is usually found in weak acids.

Nick Pascua 2L
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Nick Pascua 2L » Sun Dec 06, 2020 7:17 pm

The COOH is called a Carboxyl group and this gives away protons (the H+) in reactions. Carboxyl acids are typically anything with COOH and an R-group attached and like Lillian above also said it is considered a weak acid.

Gabe_Ek 1G
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Gabe_Ek 1G » Sun Dec 06, 2020 7:21 pm

CH3COOH is a weak acid because within a solution it dissociates partially, not completely, where an H+ ion is formed alongside CH3COO- ions.

Manseej Khatri 2B
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Manseej Khatri 2B » Mon Dec 07, 2020 12:54 am

Hi. When you draw the lewis structure, I believe it is more stable for the H+ to break off from the O, rather than from the OH to break off from the carbon. Oxygen is highly electronegative so it unlikely would donate its electron to Carbon for it to have a stable shell, leaving the resulting anion with a radical if the OH group is broken off. As such it is more stable for the H to break off instead as the resulting anion would be more stable.

EnricoArambulo3H
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Re: sapling #6

Postby EnricoArambulo3H » Mon Dec 07, 2020 1:01 am

Though the atom does appear to have an --OH group, if you look at a larger scale, there is a --COOH group, which is known as a carboxylic acid. This is an example of an acid in an organic context, and the COOH group can be deprotonated to COO-. I hope this helped!

jessicasilverstein1F
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Re: sapling #6

Postby jessicasilverstein1F » Mon Dec 07, 2020 2:22 pm

The CH3COOH has a carboxyl group COOH. This helps in determining that it a weak acid.

David Liu 1E
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Re: sapling #6

Postby David Liu 1E » Mon Dec 07, 2020 3:50 pm

the carboxyl groups shows that it's an acid!

Dominic Benna 2E
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Dominic Benna 2E » Mon Dec 07, 2020 4:58 pm

The H in the COOH of the CH3COOH breaks off as a positive proton, so it makes it an acid.

aashmi_agrawal_3d
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Re: sapling #6

Postby aashmi_agrawal_3d » Mon Dec 07, 2020 8:22 pm

It has a carboxyl group which makes it an acid.

Maddie Turk Disc 2J
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Maddie Turk Disc 2J » Tue Dec 08, 2020 10:42 am

COOH is a carboxyl group, signifying a weak acid normally.

105618850
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Re: sapling #6

Postby 105618850 » Thu Dec 10, 2020 11:03 pm

The hydrogen in the carboxyl group results in the transfer of a proton, making the molecule a proton donator and therefore, an acid.

Joshua Eidam 2A
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Joshua Eidam 2A » Fri Dec 11, 2020 12:17 am

I thought the same thing but as previously mentioned, the COOH gives it away to be a weak acid. It dissociates partially into H+ and COO−.
Here is a link that explains more about the carboxyl group: http://www.phschool.com/science/biology ... %20vinegar.
Hope this is helpful.

Jason Knight - 1F
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Jason Knight - 1F » Fri Dec 11, 2020 10:30 am

CH3COOH has a COOH carboxyl group which gives away the (H+) in reactions giving it acidic character. Acetic acid is a weak, monoprotic acid.

Madisen Brown -1C
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Madisen Brown -1C » Fri Dec 11, 2020 4:15 pm

CH3COOH has a carboxyl group therefore it's considered a weak acid because it dissociates partially to release hydrogen ions.

Jenaye Brelland 2I
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Jenaye Brelland 2I » Fri Dec 11, 2020 4:21 pm

A compound that ends with the carboxyl group COOH is an acid.

Jiapeng Han 1C
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Jiapeng Han 1C » Sat Dec 12, 2020 4:02 am

The carboxyl group could donate a H atom to form COO- and H+, so it is an acid, a weak acid though.

Jiwon_Chae_3L
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Jiwon_Chae_3L » Sat Dec 12, 2020 4:56 am

The COOH group makes it an acid

Melanie Lin 3E
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Re: sapling #6

Postby Melanie Lin 3E » Sat Dec 12, 2020 9:01 pm

CH3COO- is a polyatomic ion so it's not exactly a hydroxide ion with CH3O. So CH3OOH is actually a CH3COO- bonded with a H+ ion.


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