Acids & Bases

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Sean Phen
Posts: 107
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:01 pm

Acids & Bases

Postby Sean Phen » Tue Dec 15, 2020 11:00 pm

How do you tell which is the acid and which is the base?

Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1G
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Re: Acids & Bases

Postby Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1G » Tue Dec 15, 2020 11:12 pm

There are two possible definitions:
Lewis acid- a species that accepts an electron pair
Lewis base- donates an electron pair
Bronsted acid- a proton donor
Bronsted base- accepts a proton
They mean the same thing, it's just a matter of preference.

Sydney Lam_2I
Posts: 96
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:09 pm

Re: Acids & Bases

Postby Sydney Lam_2I » Tue Dec 15, 2020 11:58 pm

Also, I believe that we will be using more of the Bronsted definition for 14B!

vanessanguyen3I
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Re: Acids & Bases

Postby vanessanguyen3I » Wed Dec 16, 2020 1:31 am

Going off of what Caelin said, acids also typically have H in their name at the beginning like HCl. If not that, they also usually have -COOH in their names to represent the carboxyl group in weak acids. For bases, they're typically metal oxides or hydroxides.

David Liu 1E
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:07 pm

Re: Acids & Bases

Postby David Liu 1E » Wed Dec 16, 2020 2:16 pm

you should look at what accepts/loses an electron/proton and that will tell you which ones act as an acid or base! You could also memorize certain patterns like how anything that starts with h is generally an acid and anything ending with oh is usually a base (and the group 1 and group 2 patterns)

cadytran1K
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: Acids & Bases

Postby cadytran1K » Wed Dec 16, 2020 2:25 pm

For me, I go off the name of the compound. Acids usually have a H at the beginning of the name, so I typically identify the acids first and then go off from there.

Alison Perkins 2B
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Re: Acids & Bases

Postby Alison Perkins 2B » Wed Dec 16, 2020 2:34 pm

A Bronstead Acid, or just an acid, is a species that can donate a proton. A Lewis Acid is a species that accepts an electron pair.
A Bronstead Base, or just a base, is a species that accepts a proton. A Lewis Base is one that donates an electron pair.

Melissa Solis 1H
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:08 pm

Re: Acids & Bases

Postby Melissa Solis 1H » Wed Dec 16, 2020 4:30 pm

It honestly all depends on which definition of acids and bases you're using.

Bronsted Acid: Able to donate a proton
Bronsted Base: Able to receive a proton
Lewis Acid: Electron pair acceptor
Lewis Base: Able to donate a pair of nonbonding electrons

Keshav Patel 14B 2B
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:40 pm

Re: Acids & Bases

Postby Keshav Patel 14B 2B » Wed Dec 16, 2020 5:59 pm

Theres many different types of ways to define an acid and a base. A Lewis base and acid, the base being the one that donates electrons while the acid is the one accepting. By the Bronsted definition, the acids are the ones releasing an H+ and bases accepting an H+.

205323697
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Feb 25, 2020 12:15 am

Re: Acids & Bases

Postby 205323697 » Thu Dec 17, 2020 9:53 am

Why are bronsted acids and bases important? what do they do


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