Difference between Lewis and Bronsted bases

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Orly Termeie 3I
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Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Difference between Lewis and Bronsted bases

Postby Orly Termeie 3I » Tue Nov 24, 2015 5:08 pm

When given a chemical formula how can you tell whether the acid given is a lewis acid or bronsted base?

Ronald Yang 2F
Posts: 86
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Difference between Lewis and Bronsted bases

Postby Ronald Yang 2F » Tue Nov 24, 2015 5:37 pm

Well, if it's an acid, most likely it won't be any kind of base. But, if you're confused about the difference between a Bronsted base and Lewis base or between a Bronsted acid and Lewis acid, Bronsted focuses on the transfer of protons (H+), while Lewis focuses on the transfer of electron pairs. A compound can be deemed a lewis acid if it can accept electron pairs, like BCl3 (incomplete octet) or Na+ (positive charge). A compound can be deemed a Bronsted Base if it can accept H+ protons, so Cl- or OH- or NO3- (usually negative ions). A base could be both Bronsted and Lewis. A good example is NH3. Here's a general rule: if has H+ connected with common anion or OH- connected with a common cation, then most likely in a bronzed form. If has electron pairs on central atom, may be a lewis base; if it has an incomplete octet or positive charge with no H, then may be able to accept electron pairs and is deemed a lewis acid. Not sure if this helps you at all, but if not, I'm willing to clarify more stuff.


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