Bronsted Acids and Bases versus Lewis Acids and Bases

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Iris Shim 1E
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Bronsted Acids and Bases versus Lewis Acids and Bases

Postby Iris Shim 1E » Tue Dec 05, 2017 11:52 pm

I don't understand why there are two names for acids and bases. Are there instances where a Bronsted acid is not a Lewis acid or a Bronsted base is not a Lewis base or vice versa? What is the difference between the two definitions?

Rachel Lu_dis1H
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Re: Bronsted Acids and Bases versus Lewis Acids and Bases

Postby Rachel Lu_dis1H » Tue Dec 05, 2017 11:58 pm

The difference between the two definitions are-
Bronsted acid: donates a proton Bronsted base: accepts a proton
Lewis acid: species that accepts an electron pair Lewis base: species that donates an elctrion pair
The bronsted definition is more strict and while the lewis definition is more general. Thus, all bronsted acids are lewis acids. However, not all lewis acids are bronsted acids.

Angelica Mercado 1A
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Bronsted Acids and Bases versus Lewis Acids and Bases

Postby Angelica Mercado 1A » Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:56 pm

The Lewis definition of an acid/base focuses on where electron move to (i.e. acids have an empty orbital), while the Bronsted definition focuses on where protons move to (i.e. acids have to have a proton to donate).

Erin Jannusch
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Bronsted Acids and Bases versus Lewis Acids and Bases

Postby Erin Jannusch » Fri Dec 08, 2017 1:50 am

The Lewis definition of a base is broader than the Bronsted definition. Although every Bronsted base is a Lewis base, not every Lewis base is a Bronsted base. Carbon monoxide is a Lewis base, but it is not a Bronsted base because it does not accept protons.


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