HCl Acid

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Olivia Young 1A
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

HCl Acid

Postby Olivia Young 1A » Thu Nov 29, 2018 6:54 pm

In lecture we discussed how HCl in an aqueous state is hydrochloric acid. So, if we do not specify that HCl is aqueous, is it not considered an acid?

Patrick Cai 1L
Posts: 93
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: HCl Acid

Postby Patrick Cai 1L » Thu Nov 29, 2018 7:43 pm

If HCl is not specified as aqueous, it is in its solid, powdered form, where it is not considered an acid.

Xinyi Zeng 4C
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: HCl Acid

Postby Xinyi Zeng 4C » Fri Nov 30, 2018 5:37 pm

I feel that in the Bronsted definition, it did not specify that the acid/base must be in aqueous form, as the definition of acid if "a substance that can donate a proton to another substance". So the important thing is that it can donate a proton.

Sean Reyes 1J
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: HCl Acid

Postby Sean Reyes 1J » Sat Dec 01, 2018 9:50 am

Most acids must be aqueous as this implies the idea that the acid can dissociate when in solution. This follows the Arrhenius definition of an acid, as this definition basically means that the acid will dissociate into its conjugate base along with an H+ ion.

Sean Reyes 1J
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: HCl Acid

Postby Sean Reyes 1J » Sat Dec 01, 2018 9:53 am

I realized I kind of didn't answer the question, my bad ahhhhh
If the state of HCL is not mentioned, then depending on the context of the reaction you can see what state it is. For example, if it is reacting with water to form hydronium ions and chloride ions, then it is most likely acting as an acid and is aqueous.


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