Why Can't Double Bonded O's Accept Protons?

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Nathan Tran 4K
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Why Can't Double Bonded O's Accept Protons?

Postby Nathan Tran 4K » Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:49 pm

I encountered this problem I 12.127 in the 6th edition book where the question asked how many protons could interact with thymine. My question is how come double bonded O can't accept H. Someone told me that it was because this would make O have a formal charge of +1, but when you add the proton to N in thmine, the formal charge also becomes +1, yet it can still accept the proton. Can someone explain this to me?

Andrew Bennecke
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: Why Can't Double Bonded O's Accept Protons?

Postby Andrew Bennecke » Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:42 am

I believe that it is because Oxygen only has 2 unpaired electrons in its valence shell, so it is the most stable when those two unpaired electrons are in 2 bonded pairs, but introducing a third bonding pair would imply that one of Oxygen's already bonded pairs has formed a covalent bond with the Hydrogen where the Oxygen shares both of its electrons.


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