J.1

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JamieVu_2C
Posts: 108
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

J.1

Postby JamieVu_2C » Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:32 pm

Identify each compound as either a Brønsted acid or a Brønsted base: (a) NH3 ; (b) HBr; (c) KOH; (d) H2SO3 ; (e) Ca(OH)2 .

Is there a strategy for identifying each compound as a Bronsted acid/base?

Isha_Maniyar_Dis2E
Posts: 110
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: J.1

Postby Isha_Maniyar_Dis2E » Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:36 pm

For starters, you should memorize the strong acids (HBr, Hi, HCl, HClO3, HClO4, H2SO4, HNO3) and the strong bases (LiOH, NaOH, KOH, RbOH, CsOH, Ca(OH)2, Sr(OH)2, Ba(OH)2.

This will help you figure out a lot of the Bronsted acids and bases. It also helps to know conjugate acid/base pairs, such as NH4+ and NH3. NH4+ is the acid, and NH3 is its conjugate base.

Hope this helped!

Lindsey Chheng 1E
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

Re: J.1

Postby Lindsey Chheng 1E » Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:38 pm

JamieVu_1D wrote:Identify each compound as either a Brønsted acid or a Brønsted base: (a) NH3 ; (b) HBr; (c) KOH; (d) H2SO3 ; (e) Ca(OH)2 .

Is there a strategy for identifying each compound as a Bronsted acid/base?


I think you just have to already know which compounds are acids or bases. The compounds in this question are popular examples of acids and bases which you will probably encounter a lot in this section. Just as a recap, The Bronsted-Lowry definition of acids and bases are focused on the proton (H+). Bronsted Acids are proton (H+) donors and Bronsted Bases are the proton (H+) acceptors. My high school chemistry teacher used the phrase "shake and take", where acids "shake" off an H+ and bases "take" an H+.

Hope this helped!

Yuri Lin 4H
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: J.1

Postby Yuri Lin 4H » Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:43 pm

Hi! Good answer above, and just wanted to add that Bronsted acids are H+ donors and Bronsted bases are H+ acceptors. Most of the time you can tell by looking at the compound which one would donate/accept protons, though there are of course exceptions when a compound can do both.

For example, along with memorizing that HBr is a strong acid, the compound is much more likely to donate an H+ than accept an H+, so you know it has to be a Bronsted acid.


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