Identifying Bronsted acids and bases

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nicolely2F
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Identifying Bronsted acids and bases

Postby nicolely2F » Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:51 pm

Exercise 6A.9 asks to identify which of the reactions below occur between Bronsted acids and bases. I have no problem identifying which compound is donating or accepting a proton. I'm confused on c) and d) mostly. How do I know c) isn't a Bronsted reaction? I thought it was because there is a transfer of H between CH3OOH and NH3. And then d) is a Bronsted reaction but it seems very similar to c).

a) NH4I + H2O -> NH3 + H3O+ + I-
b) NH4I -> NH3 + HI
c) CH3COOH + NH3 -> CH3CONH2 + H2O
d) NH4I + KNH2 -> KI + 2NH3

DLee_1L
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Identifying Bronsted acids and bases

Postby DLee_1L » Sat Nov 30, 2019 4:04 pm

C) and d) aren't considered bronzed-lowry reactions because there is no simple transfer of a H atom in the chemical reaction.

nicolely2F
Posts: 149
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Identifying Bronsted acids and bases

Postby nicolely2F » Sat Nov 30, 2019 4:50 pm

DLee_3C wrote:C) and d) aren't considered bronzed-lowry reactions because there is no simple transfer of a H atom in the chemical reaction.


By that do you mean that in c) it isn't the H that is transferred, but the OH-?
Solutions manual says d) is a Bronsted reaction.

DLee_1L
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Identifying Bronsted acids and bases

Postby DLee_1L » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:42 pm

Sorry, for c) yeah, its because there is an OH and NH2 swapping places. Since there's no H atom transfer, not a bronsted-lowry acid&base. For d), it is a bronsted Lowry reaction because once you separate everything into the molecules, Nh4 gives one of its h atoms to nh2. Sorry about that, didn't look at it close enough.

nicolely2F
Posts: 149
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Identifying Bronsted acids and bases

Postby nicolely2F » Wed Dec 04, 2019 2:12 am

DLee_3C wrote:Sorry, for c) yeah, its because there is an OH and NH2 swapping places. Since there's no H atom transfer, not a bronsted-lowry acid&base. For d), it is a bronsted Lowry reaction because once you separate everything into the molecules, Nh4 gives one of its h atoms to nh2. Sorry about that, didn't look at it close enough.


That explains everything, thanks a lot!


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